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More on the Border

Like everyone else, I’m having trouble getting my comments to post. So here’s a response to this comment left on the post where I advocated a military response to Mexican troops entering US territory and drawing weapons on the US Border Patrol.

Just curious, but if US military or LE persons were to be caught entering Mexico illegally in a similar manner, (mexico’s law of course) and an ensuing fight killed the Americans, what would you say then?

Response: To be clear, a very large part of my reasoning here is based on past action (and inaction) on the part of the Mexican military and police.

If the US had a de facto policy of assisting illegal border crossers (including criminals and drug dealers) and a corrupt system that encouraged illegal crossings, with a history of aiding the criminals to enter Mexico illegally to do illegal things, with many examples of doing nothing to help secure things, and THEN American troops entered Mexico and pulled guns on Mexican authorities, I’d say the US troops were fair game.

But that’s not at all what we’re talking about here, and everyone knows it.

If, on the other hand, Mexican authorities appeared to be honestly doing the best they could, even if it wasn’t terribly effective, and they had a history of going out of their way to help our government stem the flow and had always been very conscious of the border and the situation and THEN Mexican troops crossed the border and pulled guns on our Border Patrol in an honest misunderstanding of some sort, I’d say it was probably an honest mistake and let’s clear it up and move on.

But that’s also not at all what we’re talking about here, and everyone knows it.

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Comments

  • 11Bravo says:

    We are fighting a war in Iraq ostensibly to spread democracy and to further human rights. Has anyone thought about doing the same in Mexico? The European population of Mexico, about 9%, controls most of the wealth in that nation. I consider the exodus of millions of mestizos and indigenous people tantamount to ‘ethnic cleansing’. In addition, it appears the Mexican government at all levels is corrupt and people are forced to pay bribes to avoid arrest and to start businesses. Clearly the system is not conducive to a democratic, free market economy. In addition, it presents itself as a security issue given the free flow of drugs and people that go on daily without our knowledge. I don’t suggest sending in the military in a full frontal assault, although I would welcome more troops along the border. However, why can’t the US government fund pro democracy groups in Mexico like we have a habit of doing in places that aren’t really any of our business. If we can pull the strings and swap Iranian leaders, influence Kosovo and countless other places, why can’t we do the same in Mexico. You would think we could get Mexican-Americans together and organize a way to make regime change. These Mexican-Americans who have become successful in business would be able to provide valuable lessons. Bottom line, Latin America is an immigration time bomb that just won’t go away until that part of the world provides an opportunity for its citizens to flourish. I think the top priority of the US government should be on helping to establish Mexico, Brazil and Argentina as economic powerhouses at least comparable to Canada. If Mexico, Argentina and Brazil were operating at a more efficient clip, they would provide the release valve for the rest of latin america. It makes more sense to help them there then it does to turn the US into a latin nation. We have already hit 300 million and will probably hit 400 million by mid century. Most of that is coming from south of the border. That is too much immigration from one part of the world to leave America unchanged. Actually it is not even immigration it is Migration.

  • coolhand77 says:

    At this point, if its proven that Mexican troops are coming across and holding out guys at gunpoint, or if the Mexican Government is unwilling to abide treaty, or if they are cartels and the Mexican Government is unwilling to do anything about it, how does that make Mexico any different that the terrorist supporting state that Afganistan or Iraq were, or Iran is today? Sure, we can pull a regime change half a world away, but we can’t do it next door? What gives?

  • "Hannibal" says:

    Well I guess its time to go back to the halls of Montezuma.

    -Remember the Alamo!

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