kamagra soft pas cher

Afghan Technical

Looks like a Ford Ranger with extended cab, roll bar, and optional PKM machine gun mount:

Deputy Commander Brig. Gen. Sanaullah Bader, Afghan National Army 209th Corps, hosted a security meeting with top NATO and Afghan National Security Force representatives in Regional Command North Aug. 28 at Camp Shaheen. The purpose of the meeting was to approve the deployment of the 209th Corps 3rd Brigade soldiers to Samangon and Balkh provinces to provide security for the upcoming Sept. 18 elections as well as to discuss and review upcoming joint missions.

Deputy Commander Brig. Gen. Sanaullah Bader, Afghan National Army 209th Corps, hosted a security meeting with top NATO and Afghan National Security Force representatives in Regional Command North Aug. 28 at Camp Shaheen. The purpose of the meeting was to approve the deployment of the 209th Corps 3rd Brigade soldiers to Samangon and Balkh provinces to provide security for the upcoming Sept. 18 elections as well as to discuss and review upcoming joint missions. Photo by Tech. Sgt. Casey Martin.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments

  • SwissFreek says:

    Won’t take much terrain to jam those tires into the fenders.

  • ER says:

    mmm, wonder if I can order a PKM mount, from my ford dealer, would be handy for ‘roo shooting

  • Flanker says:

    Yea………we handed those out by the cargo ship load in the ANP training prgram I was invovlved in.

    The big problem was (well actually two big problems) was the (pick one or both) Provincial or District Police chiefs stealing them for personal use and/or resale on the black market (most of the Chiefs were Young Republicans and very much in to the entreprenuerial thing). Frequently the stolen trucks would receive a repaint and the brazen ******* would drive them around town! The next thing we’d know was the Chief would be bitchin about how he couldn’t get his men moved around becuase he didn’t have the trucks to do it, and he’d be asking for more trucks. To the best of my knowledge, our program did not maintain inventory lists of trucks provided against trucks reported destroyed or stolen, and if you thnk any of the Afghanis maintained inventory lists of them (if they did it was nothing they’d let us know about) I want some of what you’ve been smokin’! If the trucks weren’t getting ripped off, valuable equipment was up for grabs too………like radio systems, lights, sirens etc.

    Second big problem; giving people fairly complicated systems for which they have NO logistics or support base. The trucks would start breaking down by the 2500 to 3000 mile mark due the extrememly rugged conditions, NO preventative or regular maintenance, and no service network. Oddly enough parts from the left over Russian UAZs and what nots wouldn’t fit well on the Rangers.

    BTW: That’s an ANP truck in the photo………ANA trucks were/are usually painted tan.

    • Murdoc says:

      Stealing gear for personal use or black market sales? Asking for more to replace what’s been stolen/sold? Lack of oversight?

      That noise you just heard is the noise Murdoc not being shocked.

      I think everyone expects a fair amount of loss/misappropriation/theft in any huge logistical operation, especially one going on for an extended period of time. And I think everyone expects that to be “times ten” when it takes place in certain dusty corners of the globe like this one.

      It’s not damning that it happens. It’s not damning that it happens a lot. What IS damning is that we appear to care so little about it. I realize that this is how business is done in some places, and that we have to, to an extent, play ball. But we seem to be a little overenthusiastic about making the game a big success.

  • [...] Here’s an Afghan option available on Ford pick-ups. [...]

  • ER says:

    so i’d be better off, trading some Afghan guys a few camels for one? at least they’d be able to service them easier.

    although the free truck that comes with it might cost a lot in postage.

    • Murdoc says:

      It’s like when the Rooskie officers were selling everything they could get their hands on in the early 90s. I would have loved to pick up some hardware.

      But the shipping and handling fees were outrageous. LOL.

  • Flanker says:

    In fairness……..it’s been over three years since I left that mission. There may have been significant improvments in fleet managment and inventory maintenance. I would not be shocked to find out theft and graft is still the national sport there though. Inferring from stories I routinely see, ANP effectivness is still below **** level; leading me to suspect many ANP are not yet committed to the idea of a central government, loayalty to it, and have given up their socio/cultural tendancy to view it as “not stealing” if it isn’t taken from someone in “their group” (usually there tribe).

    I did meet some ANP of low and high rank who seemed to be honest and really cared about making their country a better place………unfortunately they were badly out numbered by the hoardes of dickweed ******** who viewed as a pay check and an opportuntiy to steal shit to sell. If anyone thinks coalition tolerance of this attitude about the trucks is bad (I’m raising my hand at this point) you’d really bug out if you knew what was going on with the weapons we were providing them. It was extremely common for ANP Chiefs to issue just the AK and a single partially filled magazine because if they gave them more mags and ammo……….they’d just sell it (besides that was the Chief’s job).

  • I’m relatively sure the use of Ford Rangers was a political move, whether to make money for Ford, or as a CYA to prevent a “Why aren’t we buying them American-made trucks?” problem. (Nevermind that these trucks weren’t made in the US – Ford doesn’t sell a quad cab Ranger here.)

    The pickups used by the ANA and ANP were the only US made vehicles (other than Humvees) I saw in use by the Afghans the whole time I was over there (2009-2010). Toyota rules the passenger vehicle and light truck market, and Mercedes and Volvo the heavy trucks.

    The Toyota Hi-Lux pickup is functionally identical to the Ranger in the picture, and is endemic to the region. Parts and experienced mechanics are plentiful. I firmly believe they would have been better choices.

  • Fred says:

    The Hilux is so popular because they’re practically “bombproof” (well, not against real bombs… but they last forever.) I constantly wish we could get them here (apparently the thought of a light diesel pick-up makes EPA puppies cry.)

    Does anybody know if the European/Asian Ranger have a diesel engine as an option?

  • Rey G says:

    I cant speak for every AO .However in Asadabad we did inventory and track the Vechicles.With the help of the US army,s imbeded training team and the MP’s. We would go out to the districts and check vins.
    Also these trucks were great ! There were a couple of times my Afghan QRF teams and myself were the only ones who could get through some of the river crossings and passes because the humvees just could not navigate the rocks.
    However when one of my patrols was hit by an IED they were disintegrated.

Comments Closed