Loading Up the Strykers

M1128 Stryker Mobile Gun System (MGS):

Pvt. Tyler Duke, from Kingsburg, Calif., guides a Stryker vehicle onto the back of a flatbed truck at the Kuwaiti Naval Base, Aug. 26. Duke is one of the soldiers with the 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, the brigade that convoyed their own armored vehicles out of Iraq and into Kuwait last week as part of the push to get troop levels to 50,000 by Aug. 31. The Stryker soldiers are nearing the end of their efforts to get their vehicles ready for shipment to the United States. Unit Movement Officer 2nd Lt. Larry Pugh, from Athens, Ga., said soldiers are seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. “It might be hard work, it’s a lot of sweat, but this is the end.”

Pvt. Tyler Duke, from Kingsburg, Calif., guides a Stryker vehicle onto the back of a flatbed truck at the Kuwaiti Naval Base, Aug. 26. Duke is one of the soldiers with the 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team, the brigade that convoyed their own armored vehicles out of Iraq and into Kuwait last week as part of the push to get troop levels to 50,000 by Aug. 31. The Stryker soldiers are nearing the end of their efforts to get their vehicles ready for shipment to the United States. Unit Movement Officer 2nd Lt. Larry Pugh, from Athens, Ga., said soldiers are seeing the light at the end of the tunnel. “It might be hard work, it’s a lot of sweat, but this is the end.” Photo by Natalie Cole.

4/2 SBCT is the brigade that was accelerated for deployment after 5/2 SBCT’s deployment was shifted from Iraq to Afghanistan, and the same unit which the media fretted about being sent to Iraq without enough training. Seems to me that the guys are pros and managed just fine despite the less-than-ideal scheduling.

When they get home, I wonder if they’ll have to worry about a crowd of protestors in Olympia or Tacoma?

Another below

A convoy of Stryker vehicles heads for the Port of Shuaiba, Kuwait, Aug. 26. Soldiers with the 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team drove the Strykers onto the backs of the trucks before the convoy left for the port, which is the final location in the process of shipping the Strykers to the United States.

A convoy of Stryker vehicles heads for the Port of Shuaiba, Kuwait, Aug. 26. Soldiers with the 4th Stryker Brigade Combat Team drove the Strykers onto the backs of the trucks before the convoy left for the port, which is the final location in the process of shipping the Strykers to the United States. Photo by Natalie Cole.

Comments

    1. Those steel plates were introduced into the Stryker’s Slat Armor with little fanfare, for two reasons;
      1- The Wheel Wells in the Stryker comprise 50% of their total side area, and they have NO ARMOR AT ALL.
      2- The Slat Armor left the tires completely exposed to shrapnel and small arms fire, and the XML1500 tire has a single-ply sidewall (weaker than the tire sidewalls on a Toyota Corolla).

      Thing is, it still leaves 75% of the tires exposed.

      The REAL season these steel plates have been added is so that some shoe-shining (Br)asshats can have Plausible Deniability — by pretending to have fixed the problem, they can’t be indicted as easily in the future.

      1. Its called HPK (hull protection kit) and was used mainly in Iraq due to RPG’s/EFP. They don’t run it in Afghanistan.
        Correction: wheel wells do have armor.

  1. You’ll have to ask the folks in Beaumont, Texas whether they will protest these vehicles on their return. They’re more likely to head to Anniston Alabama for reset work than to Joint Base Lewis McChord. Beaumont is closer to that base than Tacoma. Just saying.

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