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Stryker MGS Pics

Had bookmarked these to post a while back but never got around to it. So here they are now:

A Stryker vehicle awaits transportation to war-fighters in Afghanistan, in an airfield staging area in southwest Asia. Third Army assists units mobilized in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in moving the war-fighter's equipment and materiel, including Stryker vehicles. This mission critical equipment is being rapidly deployed into Afghanistan by the leader of logistical operations throughout the Central Command area of responsibility in contingency operations.

A Stryker vehicle awaits transportation to war-fighters in Afghanistan, in an airfield staging area in southwest Asia. Third Army assists units mobilized in support of Operation Enduring Freedom in moving the war-fighter's equipment and materiel, including Stryker vehicles. This mission critical equipment is being rapidly deployed into Afghanistan by the leader of logistical operations throughout the Central Command area of responsibility in contingency operations. Photo by Sgt. David Nunn.

Stryker MGS Apache Warhammer

More below!

Stryker Mobile Gun System

Stryker MGS Apache Warhammer

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Comments

  • Blacktail says:

    It looks like the Army took the muzzle brakes off of the these, which is just as well; they made the muzzle blast so violent that standing within 1/4-mile of a Stryker caused permanent hearing loss.

    The recoil isn’t an issue anymore either, since the propellant charges in the ammo have been watered-down. Thing is though, that makes the 105mm ammunition compatible ONLY with the MGS — no other AFV in the world can fire it, because the range, accuracy, and muzzle velocity are all too low for any 105mm gun sighted for NATO 105mm rounds.
    It also seems to have been forgotten that the use of standard, unmodified US 105mm rounds (then stockpiled in the US in large quantities) and commonality of ammo with US allies were part of the official justification for the MGS’ purchase.

    In reality, what the Army and GDLS spent our money on was a vehicle that had and a main gun so expensive and so long to develop (that required *totally new ammunition* not previously in existence), that developing a totally new weapon and gun bore from scratch would have been cheaper, faster, and easier.

    And did I mention that the autoloader jams on every 3rd-to-4th round?

    • Murdoc says:

      I’ll agree that the decision to use M68A1s left over from the first M1s was not a good one. I would rather see two big gun versions, a 25mm or 30mm similar to what the Marines and some other countries use and an MGS with a lower-velocity cannon like the one developed for the M8 AGS or something similar.

  • Blacktail says:

    The Rheinmetall M35 used on the M8 Buford was not a low-velocity weapon — it fired standard, FULL-POWER 105mm NATO ammunition!

    The secret to it’s manageable recoil was being an LRF (Low Recoil Force) gun, full of mechanisms that dampen recoil via mechanical disadvantage, so it could fire “hot” (compared to the M68E1) ammunition.

    Now, you’re probably wondering, “why didn’t GDLS use this gun on the Stryker?” The answer is simple — GDLS would have to ACTUALLY SPEND MONEY to use it, because the M35 is a *Rheinmetall* product.
    By contrast, Royal Ordnance (the company that built the M68-series) was absorbed into GDLS years before, so GDLS thus owned the rights to the M68A1, as well as a considerable stockpile of surplus M68A1s.

    As a result, GDLS could use the M68A1 FOR FREE, and the Stryker MGS was seen as an opportunity to sell them — never mind the fact that the M68A1 has more than 27 short tons of recoil, or that the Stryker MGS was promised to weigh 18 short tons.

    So there you have it; the reason the Stryker MGS is armed with a weapon with too much recoil is because GDLS opted to save a buck, and charge five more.

    • Murdoc says:

      Oops. You’re right. I knew it used standard ammo.

      I also agree that the CV-90 appears to be a good design and who doesn’t love the 40mm?

      • Blacktail says:

        That 40mm is a really brutal weapon, but there’s one thing that bugs me about it — the CV9040 only holds 240 40mm rounds.

        Once the main gun of an AFV starts getting big, the ammo capacity goes down (unless you’ve got some mad Engineering skillz).

        If it were up to me to chose an autocannon for an IFV or Reece, my first choice would probably be the Mauser Mk 30 used on the ASCOD (30mm, 1000rpm, 400rds in the ASCOD).

        Mk44 Bushmaster II seems impressive, but word has it that it sometimes doesn’t respond when commanded to fire. Also, 200rpm is a little sluggish for a 21st Century autocannon (especially when one considers that the Bushmaster uses an Externally-Motivated operation, just like the 625rpm M230).

  • BD says:

    Unfortunately, cannot use the 25 mike mikes or above due to competition with the Bradley – the HBCTs claim that if you need more firepower – send in the HBCTs.

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