USS Jason Dunham (DDG 109)

The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit Jason Dunham (DDG 109) enters Port Everglades Harbor in Florida Nov. 5, 2010, to prepare for its commissioning ceremony. The ship, which is scheduled to be commissioned Nov. 13, 2010, was named after U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Jason Dunham, who was mortally wounded in Iraq in April 2004 and posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Martin Cuaron, U.S. Navy/Released)

The Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer Pre-Commissioning Unit Jason Dunham (DDG 109) enters Port Everglades Harbor in Florida Nov. 5, 2010, to prepare for its commissioning ceremony. The ship, which is scheduled to be commissioned Nov. 13, 2010, was named after U.S. Marine Corps Cpl. Jason Dunham, who was mortally wounded in Iraq in April 2004 and posthumously awarded the Medal of Honor. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Martin Cuaron, U.S. Navy/Released)

What’s the story with this DTOM flag?

Don't Tread on Me Flag Jason Dunham

Comments

    1. Yes, I’ve posted about the First Navy Jack a number of times. But this ain’t it. I’ve never seen this before, though I certainly don’t claim to be any sort of expert.

      Are the “J” and “D” for Jason Dunham? Is this a special version? Or is that just coincidence.

      1. OK, I see where you’re coming from now. From what I have read, there is no clear evidence showing what the original Naval Jack flag looked like, or even if there ever was a standard. And even if there was a standard, whatever it looked like has been lost to time.

        I’ve poked around a bit on the web, and it looks like most of the folks who have studied this (like 3 or 4 people) have concluded that there was no standard back then. Each state had their own interpretation. And there were apparently even private “sponsors” of ships, who came up with their own jack flag designs.

        I am not a member of the Navy, but I suspect they are allowing some creative interpretation in the jack flag designs. I sure hope some one in-the-know would chime in, though.

        1. All of the Navy Jacks I’ve seen on ships (until this one) including the one that the oldest ship in the fleet (currently USS Enterprise) flies have been like the one in the upper right corner of this site.

          My guess is that this is some variation on an historical version like you mention with the “JD” added. I’d sure like someone “in-the-know” to comment, though.

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