Curtiss Hudson Flier

No, it’s not the F-35C. That’s still in development.

Retired Navy Cmdr. Bob Coolbaugh sits in the pilot seat of a replica Curtiss Hudson Flier biplane, the first aircraft to launch from the deck of a navy ship, Nov. 15, 2010, on the flight deck of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) while in port in Norfolk, Va. The replica was built as part of celebrations for the centennial of naval aviation. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nicholas Hall, U.S. Navy/Released)

Retired Navy Cmdr. Bob Coolbaugh sits in the pilot seat of a replica Curtiss Hudson Flier biplane, the first aircraft to launch from the deck of a navy ship, Nov. 15, 2010, on the flight deck of USS George H.W. Bush (CVN 77) while in port in Norfolk, Va. The replica was built as part of celebrations for the centennial of naval aviation. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Nicholas Hall, U.S. Navy/Released)

Comments

  1. I can only imagine what this high tech wonder would end up costing, if we let the military procurement system handle it. 20 years later………the first prototype is fainally flying and all the production models will be $8.376 million a piece, and they’d be just as slow as this guy’s private effort! LOL!

  2. Speaking of aircraft…..But a little off this subject, here’s an interesting (inside) engineering data on the Quantas A380 recent engine failure :

    A Qantas pilot says there is some talk of writing this A380 off, as the port wing main spar damage now discovered is so severe.

    It seems to get worse and worse.!!

    More scary info on the A 380 Incident:

    1. Bus #2 is supposedly automatically powered by Bus #1, in the event of Engine #2 failure – didn’t happen.

    2. Buses #3 & #4 will supposedly power Bus #2 in the event that the auto transfer from Bus #1 fails – didn’t happen.

    3. After some time the RAT deployed for no apparent reason, locking out (as a load-shedding function) some still functioning services.

    4. One of the frequently recurring messages warned of the aircraft approaching the aft C of G limit, (the procedure calls for transferring fuel forward), the next message advised of fwd transfer pumps being u/s. This sequence occurred repeatedly.

    5. Apparently landing/approach speeds are obtained from the FMS, but there weren’t anywhere near sufficient fields to load all the defects for speed corrections – the crew loaded what they thought were the most critical ones.

    6. The crew commenced an approach NOT because they’d sorted out all the problems but because they were very worried about the ‘way-out-of-tolerance’, and steadily worsening, lateral imbalance.

    7. The aircraft stopped with just over 100 metres or runway left, brakes temps climbed to 900C and fuel pouring out of the ruptured tank. Unable to shutdown #1 engine (as previously mentioned) but elected not to evacuate as the fire services were attending in great numbers.

    8. The other comment from the source of the above, (who was on the flight deck), was that the aeroplane did many things they simply didn’t understand and/or failed to operate as expected.

  3. Toejam … Interesting points. Where did you get them? I have not been keeping up on the airbus incident.

    At first blush, It looks like an example of insufficient damage control modeling. Given the known problem airbus had with the development of this bird, it would make sense that it’s systems may of failed under actual catastrophic conditions. Electric jets are great when they work, but get real dicy when things go wrong.

    The structural damage does bring up a concern with the 787 dream liner. Those composite structures do not forgive.

  4. James,

    I cannot give you the person’s name but he is connected with a European aerospace agency, which is working with Rolls Royce and Airbus on the engine component failure problem.

    I have it on very good information there is more to come from the investigation.

    You’re correct regarding the B787. I’m concerned as well since composite shatters into pieces when catastrophic damage is encountered rather than just peel back or bend like aluminium.

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