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HH-60M Pave Hawk

U.S. Army helicopter crew chiefs with Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 126th Aviation Regiment stand outside an HH-60M Pave Hawk medical evacuation helicopter as it warms up on Camp Taji, Iraq, Jan. 3, 2010. The unit was the first to receive the HH-60M, which is the Army’s newest medical evacuation helicopter. (DoD photo by Spc. Roland Hale, U.S. Army/Released)

U.S. Army helicopter crew chiefs with Charlie Company, 3rd Battalion, 126th Aviation Regiment stand outside an HH-60M Pave Hawk medical evacuation helicopter as it warms up on Camp Taji, Iraq, Jan. 3, 2010. The unit was the first to receive the HH-60M, which is the Army’s newest medical evacuation helicopter. (DoD photo by Spc. Roland Hale, U.S. Army/Released)

I’m not sure that the Army HH-60Ms are actually called “Pave Hawks.” As far as I’ve seen, they’re always called regular Black Hawks. Can anyone confirm?

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Comments

  • SwissFreek says:

    Pave Hawk is the Air Force version. PAVE is a series of AF-specific electronics programs that covered to a bunch of platforms and weapons (Pave Hawk, Pave Low, Pave Paws, Pave Spike, etc.), so an Army Blackhawk would definitely not fall into that category.

  • jaymaster says:

    I’ve heard that “PAVE” is an acronym for Precision Aircraft Vectoring Electronics, or Precision Avionics Vision, Enhanced, or some such.

    Basically, it is applied to any platform with an enhanced night and/or foul weather vision or navigation system.

    Which makes sense, but I have no ability to confirm such a thing. I have supplied components to engineers who design such systems, and the topic comes up from time to time.

  • DJ Elliott says:

    http://www.af.mil/information/factsheets/factsheet.asp?fsID=107

    The Pave Hawk is a highly modified version of the Army Black Hawk helicopter which features an upgraded communications and navigation suite that includes integrated inertial navigation/global positioning/Doppler navigation systems, satellite communications, secure voice, and Have Quick communications.

    All HH-60Gs have an automatic flight control system, night vision goggles with lighting and forward looking infrared system that greatly enhances night low-level operations. Additionally, Pave Hawks have color weather radar and an engine/rotor blade anti-ice system that gives the HH-60G an adverse weather capability.

    Pave Hawk mission equipment includes a retractable in-flight refueling probe, internal auxiliary fuel tanks, two crew-served 7.62mm or .50 caliber machineguns, and an 8,000-pound (3,600 kilograms) capacity cargo hook. To improve air transportability and shipboard operations, all HH-60Gs have folding rotor blades.

    Pave Hawk combat enhancements include a radar warning receiver, infrared jammer and a flare/chaff countermeasure dispensing system.

    HH-60G rescue equipment includes a hoist capable of lifting a 600-pound load (270 kilograms) from a hover height of 200 feet (60.7 meters), and a personnel locating system that is compatible with the PRC-112 survival radio and provides range and bearing information to a survivor’s location.

    A limited number of Pave Hawks are equipped with an over-the-horizon tactical data receiver that is capable of receiving near real-time mission update information.

  • 11 Bravo says:

    To my knowledge only USAF variants are known as PAVE. Even Army MH-60 variants used by the 160th Av Reg are not called PAVE, despite a similar appearance with the refueling probe.

    This HH-60M would still be a Black Hawk, but if the troops called it by any other name, they would probably call it ‘Dustoff.’

    Where did you get the picture, MO? Was it from af.mil? My guess is USAF personal would not know the difference.

    • Pave says:

      this is an army bird. PAVE hawk is the name given to the CSAR birds of the air force. the hh60m is another variant of the hh60g. both carry the name PAVE.. Precision Avionic Vectoring Equipment.. Pave only refers to the equipment on the helicopter

  • 11 Bravo says:

    Here is a question for those in the know. I thought the Army was buying the UH-72 Lakota to use as air ambulances. From this article it looks like they are already being supplied to both active and national guard units.

    Why then are they buying the HH-60M?

    • SwissFreek says:

      The Lakota is not meant to be deployed. It is meant to be used in the States in order to free up more Blackhawks for use overseas. So it’s more “off-the-shelf” than a platform that would need the survivability and equipment for combat use or operations in extremely austere environments, which makes it cheaper and quicker to procure.

  • Flanker says:

    Looks brand new and shiny; in a flat brown kinda way. What’s up with that camo pattern the CCs are wearing. Desert ABU?? Everyone (Army flight crews) were all wearing standard ABU on my last tour in the sandbox. If it is a desert version of ABU, that’s a step forward as the standard ABU was the perfect compromise (blended with nothing! LOL!).

    • SwissFreek says:

      Looks to me like they are wearing standard ACUs that just look tinted because of the color saturation of the photo. Same with the paint on the Blackhawk. It doesn’t normally look that brown, it’s more green-black.

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