Cobra Gold: Amtracs headed for shore

U.S. Marines with Charlie Company, 2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit execute a maritime preposition of force to demonstrate the amphibious capabilities of the U.S. Marine Corps during exercise Cobra Gold 2011 at Sattahip Naval Station in Thailand Jan. 23, 2011. Cobra Gold is a regularly-scheduled joint/combined exercise designed to ensure regional peace and strengthen the ability of the Royal Thai Armed Forces to defend Thailand or respond to regional contingencies. (DoD photo by Pfc. Nathaniel Henry, U.S. Marine Corps/Released)

U.S. Marines with Charlie Company, 2nd Assault Amphibian Battalion, 31st Marine Expeditionary Unit execute a maritime preposition of force to demonstrate the amphibious capabilities of the U.S. Marine Corps during exercise Cobra Gold 2011 at Sattahip Naval Station in Thailand Jan. 23, 2011. Cobra Gold is a regularly-scheduled joint/combined exercise designed to ensure regional peace and strengthen the ability of the Royal Thai Armed Forces to defend Thailand or respond to regional contingencies. (DoD photo by Pfc. Nathaniel Henry, U.S. Marine Corps/Released)

Not sure where these launched from, but MO had a shot of one jumping off the ramp of a T/AK the other day.

Comments

  1. Could someone familiar with the USMC tell me how many AAVs are in an Assault Amphibian Battalion. I know USMC tank battalions have around 60 tanks which is comparable to an Army tank battalion. I am assuming they have around 60 AAVs in the amphibian battalions. Is this correct?

  2. Actually they launched from the USNS 1ST Lt. Jack Lummus just outside the Sattahip Naval Station, Chantaburi Province, Kingdom of Thailand. I took the photo. And for Bravo’s question, the number of AAV’s in a battalion is 8.

  3. We load the troops into them and airdrop them out the back of a C-5. The Marine Corps version of Air cavalry.

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