Making the jump to hyperspace

A U.S. Navy F/A-18C Hornet assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 113 breaks the sound barrier during an air power demonstration over the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), June 6, 2011, in the Pacific Ocean. Carl Vinson and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 were under way in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Travis K. Mendoza, U.S. Navy/Released)

A U.S. Navy F/A-18C Hornet assigned to Strike Fighter Squadron (VFA) 113 breaks the sound barrier during an air power demonstration over the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Carl Vinson (CVN 70), June 6, 2011, in the Pacific Ocean. Carl Vinson and Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 17 were under way in the U.S. 7th Fleet area of responsibility. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Travis K. Mendoza, U.S. Navy/Released)

Comments

  1. Nice!

    Back in the mid ’90s…..my then wife and I attended the Kalamazoo Air Show. The preceding Friday everning had been very thunder stormy, and it was still raining on and off; Satureday AM. Despite our misgivings………we drove down to Kazoo anyway. The flight demos were postponed due to the low (800-1000 cloud feet) ceiling, but we were able to walk around and check out quite a few cool aricraft on static display. By early afternoon, it was till a very low ceiling and high humidity……….but, the show “powers that be” gave us all a break and let the two show “stars” give their demos a try anyway. The stars were a Roayal Canadian AF F18 and and an F14 from VF whatever……..”The Jolly Rogers”. Holy ****………what a bitchin’ show! The low ceiling meant the two pilots and planes (flew separate demos needless to say) were forced to stay quite low, as opposed to their more normal demo altitudes, under the clouds (which were about 1000-1500 feet then), so they were very visible to us. And the high humidity cause umpteen shockwave vortexes and such to roll off the 18 & 14 as they wowed all of us on the ground. Outstanding show!

  2. Cool pic for sure. But it’s got some weird photoshop like artifacts down at the sea/horizon interface. I wonder what that’s all about?

  3. jaymaster
    Those are refractions caused by the aircraft’s shock waves; if you look carefully, you can trace them back to the airframe.

    Cheers

  4. Wow, J.M. that is interesting!

    I wondered why someone would bother photoshopping the ocean part, but still leave that dust blob right above the jet.

    Thanks!

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