Submerged 22-ton Engine Block

U.S. Navy divers view a 22-ton engine block off the coast of Bridgetown, Barbados, June 16, 2011, during Navy Diver-Southern Partnership Station (ND-SPS). Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2 was participating in ND-SPS, a multinational partnership engagement designed to increase interoperability and partner nation capacity through diving operations. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jayme Pastoric, U.S. Navy/Released)

U.S. Navy divers view a 22-ton engine block off the coast of Bridgetown, Barbados, June 16, 2011, during Navy Diver-Southern Partnership Station (ND-SPS). Mobile Diving and Salvage Unit 2 was participating in ND-SPS, a multinational partnership engagement designed to increase interoperability and partner nation capacity through diving operations. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jayme Pastoric, U.S. Navy/Released)

So what do we think this block might be from?

Comments

  1. OK, SOMEONE’S gotta be serious here…

    I’m thinking submarine diesel. I’ve been aboard the USS Lionfish (SS-298) and it looks kinda similar. I’m absolutely no expert, but that’s my hunch.

    Oh, and Geek: I had a 1970 Thunderbird. 429 ThunderJet V-8 (7 liters). That beast could eat your ’77 for lunch.

    J.

      1. Jay,
        Oh I believe it. Mine was a 351 iirc. All stock. Two barrel carb. Ultimately sccumbed to fatal axle cancer ca 1988.

        I just remember the hood. It was like an acre of steel. Friends and I had lunch on it many times.

  2. I was reading a little about the operation. It’s an exercise where the US divers and friendly South American/Caribbean nations get together to train, practice working together, exchange ideas and methods, and so on.

    It sounds like they sink some stuff and then practice bringing it back to the surface to simulate salvage operations. So from that perspective, it could be from any handy piece of scrap.

  3. Electromotive Made 12,16 & 20 cylinder loco engines. There 4 16s & 4 20s at nuclear station that I worked at. They use them for emergency power

  4. I’ll be honest, I first looked at it and wondered… could you make it run again? Is it worth something if it was sunk inadvertently?

    I can only imagine that machining something like that is super-costly, though trying to put a gasket on something that’s as corroded as that but the is repaired sounds like a a hell of a job too.

    1. I thought I’d add the fact that I realise that’s not the cylinder head in view… but I imagine that the seals will have deteriorated and let water in slowly…

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