Stryker Pic

strykerwatch.jpg

The caption says it’s from today in Mosul. Notice the Camelbak on the trooper on the left. (via Stryker Brigade News)

As I’ve said, I won’t really be covering day-to-day Stryker news since Stryker Brigade News has it covered 24/7. That’s the place to go.

UPDATE: Todd at Stryker Brigade News comments

Notice also the additional Arrowhead patch on the right shoulder – the brigade just received their combat patches.

I had noticed the patch above the US flag, but I must admit that I didn’t realize exactly what it meant. Now I do.

When a soldier has been in combat, as officially defined by they Army, he earns the right to wear the patch of the unit we was in combat with on his right shoulder above the US flag. Soldiers always wear their current unit’s patch on their left shoulder, but they are also allowed to wear one combat patch (of any unit) that they have previously earned on their right shoulder .

I’ve seen this before, and always figured that it was something along these lines, but I didn’t know the exact rules. I realize that this is a pretty basic tradition that any private should know, so please forgive my ignorance. I’m learning. If anyone has anything to add or any corrections, drop them in the comments. I know that a lot of MO readers don’t know all these details, but are interested in learning. That also applies to at least one MO writer.

And congratulations to the men and women of the 3rd Brigade, 2nd Infantry Division.

Comments

  1. Notice also the additional Arrowhead patch on the right shoulder – the brigade just received their combat patches.

  2. Additional factoid: Some of the 3-2 infantry units, and the medics with those units, also received their combat infantry BADGES and combat medic BADGES, respectively. I recently learned what those are, as I had them confused with the combat PATCHES. I’ve never been active military, so I’m learning all this as well.