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Floating Hotel Spotted

China’s Carrier Seen From an Airliner

Photo of China’s starter carrier.

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Comments

  • GeekLethal says:

    I think that’s exactly what it is, a starter. Meaning there will be others to come later.

  • jaymaster says:

    Eh, monkey see, monkey do.

    One change I’ve heard is that their tail hooks grab on the horizontal, not the vertical…

    • Nadnerbus says:

      That made me roll my eyes… =)

      The continued growth of the Chinese economy is a necessary precondition for a future advanced Chinese carrier force. I still have doubts that what is still basically an authoritarian country can keep capitalism on a leash for their own ends without the whole thing falling apart at some point.

      Then again, if you give your people enough I Phones, Nintendos, food subsidies and the like, they may not care enough that they are essentially still slaves.

      The next two decades should be interesting.

  • Toejam says:

    “The next two decades should be interesting.”

    Nadnerbus,

    At the ripe old age of 70 I really don’t care if the Chinese build 100 carriers in the next 20-years.

    As long as my local laundry keeps cleaning my shirts and the restaurant keeps dishing out the spicy Mapo Tofu (麻婆豆腐) on boiled rice that’s all that matters.

  • 11 Bravo says:

    Give the Chinese credit. They have worked hard to bring themselves up to speed. No nation has lifted more people out of poverty in such a short time. It’s too bad the rest of the third world can’t do the same, and have resorted to invading Europe and North America instead.

    I sort of envy the Chinese in a way. It must be nice to be witnessing real progress first hand. Per capita they are behind us, but I imagine the speed of their growth and transformations taking place must be astounding. While most Americans probably believe our best days are behind, the Chinese must think the opposite.

  • jaymaster says:

    In all seriousness, I could talk for days about China. I’ve been working with Chinese (mainland and Taiwanese) for close to 20 years now. I currently have a team of engineers in both mainland China and in Taiwan under my chain of command. I’ve spent months one-on-one with many of them as they have come here to the US for training, and I talk with them almost every day.

    One thing I can say is that while they have a gazillion folks with engineering degrees, they have very few decent engineers. Good technicians, for sure. But give them a new problem, and nothing ever happens. I think this is more cultural than genetic, because there are quite a few decent engineers in Taiwan, who come form the same gene pool. They just have 40 more years of experience with capitalism under their belts, and they understand the importance of making a decision.

    But the biggest problem with China, IMO, is the massive amounts of corruption. I mean, they make something like the Chicago political machine look like amateurs, and the US defense complex look like a bastion of honesty and logic. It’s horrible, and it permeates every aspect of life. I wouldn’t be surprised if it is easier to take out a Chinese aircraft carrier by dropping a duffle bag of 20 dollar bills on it instead of a 500 lb bomb.

    Working with the younger Chinese (25-30 year olds) is pleasant. Some of them certainly “get it”. And once they open up, the first thing they complain about is the corruption, and the second is censorship. Third is pollution.

    They will spend hours on the internet here, just reading stuff they can’t get access to over there. And as a general rule, they don’t trust their own military or even their police. Again, too much corruption. And they all know what really happened in Tiananmen square.

    And while I am training them to take over my job (no, it’s not really that bad), I also derive great pleasure in exposing them to all sorts of political concepts and reading material. Everything from the Federalist Papers, to Bill Ayers, to Glenn Beck. They eat it all up. And I send them back home with a couple dozen copies of the US Constitution and a $5 bill to get them through customs. Yeah, it took me a couple years to learn that trick….

    So all in all, I don’t spend a whole lot of time worrying about what the Chinese military might do to us. Too many of their citizens have already taken a bite from the capitalist apple, and they like the taste.

  • jaymaster says:

    Sure. And if you want more, I can provide that too!

    No special credit or anything is necessary. If you still follow Dean’s World, you probably know what to expect from me. I think we actually met there years ago.

  • [...] a regular commenter here on MO: I’ve been working with Chinese (mainland and Taiwanese) for close to 20 years now. I [...]

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