Day of Infamy + 70 Years

Today marks the 70th anniversary of the attack on Pearl Harbor.

Bing, as usual, honors the day:

Bing homepage on 07 Dec 2011

Bing homepage on 07 Dec 2011

Some other search engines with a history of special graphics and whatnot for special days, as usual, do not.

Here are some posts from Pearl Harbor Day in years past on MO:

Cassin and Downes

In Drydock Number One at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard on 7 December 1941, immediatly following the Japanese attack. Both ships had been severely damaged by bomb hits and the resulting fires. In the background, also in Drydock Number One, is USS Pennsylvania (BB-38), which had received relatively light damage in the raid.  Official U.S. Navy Photograph, NHHC Collection.

In Drydock Number One at the Pearl Harbor Navy Yard on 7 December 1941, immediatly following the Japanese attack. Both ships had been severely damaged by bomb hits and the resulting fires. In the background, also in Drydock Number One, is USS Pennsylvania (BB-38), which had received relatively light damage in the raid. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, NHHC Collection.

First Shots at Pearl Harbor

"A Shot for Posterity -- The USS Ward\'s number three gun and its crew-cited for firing the first shot the day of Japan\'s raid on Hawaii. Operating as part of the inshore patrol early in the morning of December 7, 1941, this destroyer group spotted a submarine outside Pearl Harbor, opened fire and sank her. Crew members are R.H. Knapp - BM2c - Gun Captain, C.W. Fenton - Sea1c - Pointer, R.B. Nolde - Sea1c - Trainer, A.A. De Demagall - Sea1c - No. 1 Loader, D.W. Gruening - Sea1c - No. 2 Loader, J.A. Paick - Sea1c - No. 3 Loader, H.P. Flanagan - Sea1c - No. 4 Loader, E.J. Bakret - GM3c - Gunners Mate, K.C.J. Lasch - Cox - Sightsetter." (quoted from the original 1942-vintage caption) This gun is a 4"/50 type, mounted atop the ship\'s midships deckhouse, starboard side.  Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

"A Shot for Posterity -- The USS Ward's number three gun and its crew-cited for firing the first shot the day of Japan's raid on Hawaii. Operating as part of the inshore patrol early in the morning of December 7, 1941, this destroyer group spotted a submarine outside Pearl Harbor, opened fire and sank her. Crew members are R.H. Knapp - BM2c - Gun Captain, C.W. Fenton - Sea1c - Pointer, R.B. Nolde - Sea1c - Trainer, A.A. De Demagall - Sea1c - No. 1 Loader, D.W. Gruening - Sea1c - No. 2 Loader, J.A. Paick - Sea1c - No. 3 Loader, H.P. Flanagan - Sea1c - No. 4 Loader, E.J. Bakret - GM3c - Gunners Mate, K.C.J. Lasch - Cox - Sightsetter." (quoted from the original 1942-vintage caption) This gun is a 4"/50 type, mounted atop the ship's midships deckhouse, starboard side. Official U.S. Navy Photograph, from the collections of the Naval Historical Center.

“This is not a drill!”

USS Nevada getting underway on 07 Dec 1941

USS Nevada getting underway on 07 Dec 1941

Infamy

Finding the sunk Japanese midget sub in 2002

Finding the sunk Japanese midget sub in 2002

Plus today on Yahoo! News: Rare, Unseen Photos: Aftermath of Pearl Harbor

If you’ve got links to Pearl Harbor stories you particularly like, leave ’em in the comments section.

Comments

  1. Damn! I CAN NOT imagine trying to shoot down an aircraft with a honking big, incredibly slow to manually traverse and elevate cannon like the one in the Ward photo! The designers and Navy Brass musta put ’em on the ships to make the crew feel better about trying to protect the ship and themselves; rather than any realistic chance of shooting something down!

  2. Yet it was a strategic and operational failure for the Japanese. Nagumo failed to send the 3rd wave. The targets for the 3rd were the fuel farms and the subs.

    The subs ended up sinking the most ships despite bad torps.

    The base was still able to support the fleet – it had the fuel. The below-ground fuel tanks were not completed until July despite wartime priority.

    Could you imagine how the war would have gone if we had to base from California for the first 7 months?

    Yamamoto made his comment about “waking a sleeping giant” after he heard the 3rd wave had not been sent. He knew he had a limited window to win. He said before starting planning that he “could run wild for 6 months to a year” after that, if the war continued, Japan would be defensive and probably loose.

    He was hoping for a “Short, Victorious War.” The ultimate myth of military planners…

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