You Sank My Fishing Boat!

A few weeks ago in Linkzookery I pointed out a Japanese fishing boat that had drifted toward Alaska since the tsunami. A commenter later pointed out that the Coast Guard had sunk the thing.

Here’s a pic:

Crew members assigned to the USCGC Anacapa fire explosive ammunition at the Japanese fishing vessel Ryou-Un Maru April 5, 2012, 180-miles west of the Southeast Alaskan coast. The Coast Guard worked with federal, state and local agencies in Alaska to assess the immediate dangers the vessel presented and determined that sinking it would be the best course of action to minimize any environmental threats. The crewless vessel had drifted toward Alaska after the 2011 tsunami in Japan. (DoD photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Charly Hengen, U.S. Coast Guard/Released)

Crew members assigned to the USCGC Anacapa fire explosive ammunition at the Japanese fishing vessel Ryou-Un Maru April 5, 2012, 180-miles west of the Southeast Alaskan coast. The Coast Guard worked with federal, state and local agencies in Alaska to assess the immediate dangers the vessel presented and determined that sinking it would be the best course of action to minimize any environmental threats. The crewless vessel had drifted toward Alaska after the 2011 tsunami in Japan. (DoD photo by Petty Officer 2nd Class Charly Hengen, U.S. Coast Guard/Released)

Anacapa (WPB-1335) is an Island-class patrol boat and is armed with a Mk 38 25mm gun.

Always fun to see the Coasties getting in on some action.

Comments

  1. Wonder how long it took to put it down with 25mm… do you suppose it was an all-day commitment…?

  2. I hope they filled out a proper environmental impact report. There were probably all kinds of chemicals on that thing. Would have been way better to organize a multi-million dollar salvage operation to recover it and scrap it in an environmentally friendly manner.

    Or JDAM practice would have been cool too.

  3. It was certainly effective, but I wonder how efficient it was — especially considering that they could have just towed the boat to a scrapyard, or board it and set demolition charges.

    1. My understanding is that it would have been prohibitively expensive to scrap it in a first-world harbor (environmental regs), and it was too dangerous to board. Works for me.

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