Returning Fire

A Canadian soldier assigned to Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry returns fire during force-on-force training during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2012 July 8, 2012, at Bellow Air Force Station, Hawaii. RIMPAC is a U.S. Pacific Command-hosted biennial multinational maritime exercise designed to foster and sustain international cooperation on the security on the world’s oceans. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Paul Seeber, U.S. Navy/Released)

A Canadian soldier assigned to Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry returns fire during force-on-force training during Rim of the Pacific (RIMPAC) 2012 July 8, 2012, at Bellow Air Force Station, Hawaii. RIMPAC is a U.S. Pacific Command-hosted biennial multinational maritime exercise designed to foster and sustain international cooperation on the security on the world’s oceans. (DoD photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Paul Seeber, U.S. Navy/Released)

Comments

  1. Sad to see he has a cool EoTech sight, but is still using the crappy plastic drum on his Minimi. Most US SAW gunners opt for the more user-friendly and smaller soft bags. And I find it fascinating that he is carrying a bayonet despite having nothing to attach it to — not that bayonets don’t make wonderful multi-purpose tools and fighting knives; again most US soldiers won’t bother carrying a bayonet but will make their own personal choice if they want to carry a BFK.

  2. Because the Canadian Army considers it useful to be able to stick sharp things into the enemy when finishing an attack.

    Cheers

  3. Hey there Hawk,
    Unlike you Americans, we Canadians in the military actually are cross-trained on all weapons platforms: ie, a c9 gunner might be a c6 gunner or number 2 on a mortar, or a 2i/c of a section (squad), or an m203 grenadier, or a carl gustav gunner all within the scope of a few days. As such, if someone is thrown into a position last minute (for a reshuffling for various reasons), he might not have his handy-dandy soft pouch on him. Generally, most of the c9 gunners use the soft pouch overseas and if they’re in the position for an extended period of time. This guy might have just been placed in last second.
    The CF is also a lot more strict than the Americans on non-issue kit – we aren’t alloted an allowance to purchase our own gear. Just the way the cookie crumbles. On an int’l exercise, some old dinosaur-type Sgt-Majors might also institute an “only-issue kit” policy. Frustrating, but I’ve had worse ideas come down the chain of command.
    Finally, as per the bayonet – apart from it being bad-ass, it is issued to riflemen for mounting on the C7. Likely, this guy had initially been issued a bayonet when he was a rifleman, and decided he liked the feel of it. It’s not a bad knife. A lot of the guys, myself included, carry a variety of different blades as well.
    Cheers,
    Your friendly Canadian infanteer
    Ducimus

    1. Hey there Hawk,
      Unlike you Americans, we Canadians in the military actually are cross-trained on all weapons platforms: ie, a c9 gunner might be a c6 gunner or number 2 on a mortar, or a 2i/c of a section (squad), or an m203 grenadier, or a carl gustav gunner all within the scope of a few days…

      With the main exception of mortars, which are the purview of MOS 11C (indirect fire infantrymen), MOS 11B (infantrymen) are cross-trained in the weapons you mention. The 11 Charlies probably could be counted as having been trained in all the weapons you mentioned given they receive identical training with the 11 Bravos until they focus on the mortars. I am not sure about the USMC, but would imagine they would be similar.

  4. “And I find it fascinating that he is carrying a bayonet despite having nothing to attach it to”

    Hawk,

    I do believe that’s a sheathed Fairbairn-Sykes Fighting Knife and not a bayonet.

    Probably one of the best hand-to-hand weapons you could ever find.

  5. Toejam,

    It is multipurpose knife, cutter, bayonet type device. If you look closely at the hilt you can see metal loop that goes over the barrel. Regardless of whether or not his weapon that day has a bayonet lug, it is still a useful tool to carry.

  6. You’re right. At 70 my eyes aren’t too good 11 Bravo. Could it be an M-7 for the M-16 Canadian varient or the OKC-3S marine issue? To me it looks too slender to be a 3S.

  7. The M-7 doesn’t have the wire cutter and screw driver device on the scabbard. So it probably isn’t that. It looks similar to the one displayed here which says it is used by Canadian and Dutch Forces.

Comments are closed