cures for fibromyalgia

4 More Years

Well, it’s clear that a lot of people in the US think very differently than Murdoc does about what government is for and how much control people should allow it have over them.

Even so, Murdoc would rather live in America than anywhere else and he’s pretty sure so would all of the others who voted for someone other than Obama. Regardless of how they feel or what they’re saying this morning.

Murdoc would suggest that this is a loud signal that Conservatives need to change their plan. But he’s been suggesting that for years and it doesn’t seem to be getting anywhere.

facebooktwittergoogle_plusredditpinterestlinkedinmail

Comments

  • Kevin says:

    “Change their plan” is as meaningless as “Hope and Change”. Could you be more specific?

    • Murdoc says:

      Stop running Republican candidates that are nearly indistinguishable from Democrats. Start running candidates that support the principles of the US government as originally designed.

      I don’t think that personal social issues such as gay marriage, abortion, and religion should be considered important political issues, by either the candidates, the parties, or the voters. Start ignoring that stuff and worry about the real issues of national government.

  • Vitor says:

    Sincerely, that’s BS, Murdoc. I’ve never seen you defending Ron Paul, the most principled politician in Washington and largest defender of individual freedom. Romney differs very little from Obama, both belong to the status quo.

    You also always bought the hype of the War on Terror, World War 4 and all this stuff that justify foreing interventionism and huge military spending that helps to inflate the debt. You know how contradictory and immoral is to demand the american state to be minimal towards americans and agressive oversea, towards people who can’t even vote?

    The neo-con/religious pricks combo of the GOP is a recipe of failure that people are tired of. If the republicans want to be relevant again they could have embraced the true cause for freedom.

    But to love liberty is to be skeptical about the state, its wars and economic meddling, what undermines the “America fuck yeah!” feeling that many in the GOP are addict to.

    • Murdoc says:

      You’re right, I’ve never been a vocal supporter of Ron Paul. I’m not anti-Paul, either, FWIW, and support a lot of what he stands for.

      Yes, I “buy the hype” about the war, if that’s how you prefer to think about it. I don’t agree with everything that we’re doing or how we’re doing it (especially the past six years or so in Afghanistan) but the war is real and needs to be fought. I am opposed to waste in military spending, but military spending is actually spending that I think is part of the national government’s responsibility. So much of what is spent by the federal government is none of their business, in Murdoc’s humble opinion.

      • 11 Bravo says:

        Ron Paul, and Pat Buchanan for that matter, are both persona non grata in the GOP for essentially one reason. They are perceived as not being sufficiently pro-Israel because they were not onboard for our war in Iraq, and are not onboard for a war with Iran.

        Yet on other issues that actually affect the country, they were right on. No one has covered the debt, FED, inflation, bubbles, and the exorbitant costs of maintaining an overseas empire of military bases better than Paul. No one has covered the gutting of American manufacturing and the replacement of our historic European population with a largely third world demographic better than Buchanan.

        Those issues are coming home to hammer the GOP. The demographic change means the GOP will either have to change to become a democrat-lite party to appeal to these newly minted third world Americans, or they will have to increase their share of the white vote north of 60%. With all the debt and the loss of manufacturing jobs that the GOP facilitated with their religious fervor for free trade and offshoring, I doubt they can ever appeal to that many white voters.

        While the GOP was busy trying to make the middle east safe for Israel, they basically lost America. To add insult to injury even with Obama’s coolness towards the Israelis, American Jews still gave him 70% of their votes. The GOP basically spent a decade in Iraq and is leading the charge to attack Iran, and could only muster 30% of the Jewish vote.

        • Matthew Jacobs says:

          Ron Paul is as you say Persona Non Grata because Libertarian Foreign Policy would be a disaster
          for the Country. This is not the early 1800s where great Oceans on either side of the Country keep us safe.

          • 11 Bravo says:

            Ron Paul is as you say Persona Non Grata because Libertarian Foreign Policy would be a disaster
            for the Country. This is not the early 1800s where great Oceans on either side of the Country keep us safe.

            You gotta be kidding. Are you trying to say invading Iraq and occupying it for 10 years was a good idea and a wise use of resources? How about still messing in around in Afghanistan?

            Add to that conservatives were trying to get us into a war with Russia in 2008. And you call Ron Paul crazy?

            Conservatives’ foreign policy this past decade has been a disaster. To paraphrase Pat Buchanan, while conservatives were trying saving Anbar, they were losing Arizona.

            I don’t see how Ron Paul could be worse. In the end it won’t matter though because the US is through and will only decline from here. The best hope for the preservation of our Founding ideals, something the conservatives claimed they were for, is probably some peaceful dissolution of the nation along the lines of the former Czechoslovakia.

  • GeekLethal says:

    “Even so, Murdoc would rather live in America than anywhere else and he’s pretty sure so would all of the others who voted for someone other than Obama.”

    Well, that depends. America, the geographical place is tough to beat- natural beauty, good climates, plenty of space, abundant resources.

    America the political experiment, is over. A majority of voters time and again have shown that their ideas are not my ideas. I don’t want to live with them. Not so hard leaving that.

    • Murdoc says:

      I mean America the nation, not America the geography and certainly not America the government.

      Don’t get Murdoc wrong. He is quite demoralized right now about the state of mind of the voting public. I think that the ability to charge things on a credit card paid for by others is just too tempting for too many people. I’d like to think that people just don’t “get it,” but I fear that they do get what they’re voting for and have put us on this course on purpose.

      I do think that everything good eventually becomes a long defeat, with so much time and effort spent in a rearguard action trying to get back to where things were “in the good old days.” I think the long defeat for America started about 200 years ago and the rearguard action is just particularly tough right now. I don’t know if this means the final defeat is near, or if it’s just a tough spot we’re currently in that can be battled out of.

      The fact that Obama’s presidency will now turn out to be more than a blip on the radar of history is not encouraging, though.

      As for leaving, though, the thought would never cross my mind.

      • GeekLethal says:

        “As for leaving, though, the thought would never cross my mind.”

        Well and it begs the question, where would you go?

        I don’t know. But at the very least I need to get the he77 out of the northeast. Which is disappointing, because I like it here, but I can’t live among these people anymore.

        • Murdoc says:

          As for the NE USA, I can see why there might be a desire to relocate. For sure.

          Maybe not Chicago, though. And as a Michigan resident, I cannot recommend against Detroit strongly enough. But I’m sure you know that. LOL.

  • Toejam says:

    I, personally, was disappointed at the election’s outcome. I’m a rabid Conservative and, at 70, would like America to remain as I knew it when I was growing up in the 1950′s.

    However, due to a major demographic shift from the White, Anglo European dominated society to an ever growing African-American & Hispanic one during the past 30 years and a morphing of major universities ethos away from teaching “subjects” for career building toward indoctrinating young students with a Liberal/Socialist ideology the America as we know and love it is defining “liberty and Freedom” as “Federal control and Federal paternalism”….SAD!

    Obama and his Chicago gangster cronies were merely the catalyst that brought this half-century, destruction of a Democracy to a head.

    • Matthew Jacobs says:

      In my Opinion they where better less course people then. Young men where taught to be Gentlemen and the Ladies had a Modesty about them that enhanced their Femininity. Today young men don’t mature into their thirties if ever and the Ladies are now hyper sexual and Crass in there putting it all out there.
      Are the 50s and 60s better, maybe but its subjective but if someone has a way back machine I would make the trip.

  • Jason911 says:

    American has spoken – 4 years of failure wasn’t enough. We need 4 MORE years.

  • Sam-Hec says:

    I was expecting a much tighter race; followed by vote-stealing accusations and related drama.

    As far as moving? Indiana is likely your most culturally similar bet.

    As far as new GOP directions? I could write a novel.

  • Vitor says:

    The Israel fetish must stop. It’s not up to american taxpayers to subsidize this or that country. Israel has an well educated population, high tech and nukes. Why spoil them when they are perfectly capable of handling themselves?

    And 11 Bravo, the blame “third world demographics” theory has so many holes it’s not even funny, besides all dreadful racial undertones. Bad economic policies is not a matter of accent or how much melanin one carries. The War on Drugs is white and conservative to the very bone, and it has been a total failure just like the Prohibition.

    Free trade is a great thing, there is nothing wrong that the chinese, korean or eskimos becoming more productive, this mercantilism thought that the wealth of one is bad for the other makes little sense. If all the financial mumbo jumbo done by the FED and Washington come to an end, people will have to adjust to reality without any fascit economical scheme.

    The GOP burned away so many political capital by invading Iraq, that was a broken country which could not threat anyone. Nevermind all the american wealth and lives wasted, it didn’t make a single difference to Israel.

    Afstan has become an expensive game of killing skinny beardy guy that will be replace by another skinny beardy guy, and then a study shows that the drone attacks kill way more people then intended, great PR. Both wars have already killed way more people than 9/11 and doesn’t improve in anyway the capability of the USA in defending their own territory. I agree that is up to the military to defend the country, but they are not doing that at all, much the opposite. As the military demand so many funds, it only weakens the economic fundation of the country it sworn to defend.

    When Romney said recently that it’s up to the USA to “lead the world”, he went full retarded. All countries/empires that buy the stupid hype of exceptionalism find themselves ruined in few generations dealing with all kind of blowbacks and julling an ever-lasting complex and dirty game of foreign interests. Just see the middle-east and how all intervention dealt with old problems by creating new ones.

    Singapore, Switzerland and Hong Kong know where the money is. Let people work, trade and make business with little meddling and things will work out fine, forget social engineering and top-down solution from bureaucrats for both internal and external policies.

    • 11 Bravo says:

      Vitor,

      Demographics are destiny. You cannot replace a European American population that achieved so much progress over the last 200 years with third worlders and expect everything to remain the same. This is not the forum for a human biodiversity (HBD) discussion. But suffice it to say that the 30% of our population that is black and hispanic have high school dropout rates around 50% and well over 50% illegitimacy rates. That does not bode well for a country that wishes to be a first world economy with highly skilled citizens.

      If you want to see what happens when you replace a European population with a minority one, visit Detroit. And if you believe Detroit is only in poor shape because its industry left, then visit Pittsburgh and see how a city that is still predominately European is now considered one of the best places to live despite the collapse of its steel industry.

      Second, the mercantilism that you criticize is exactly what China, South Korea and Japan practiced to grow their economies. The USA became the world’s greatest economy under a general tariff. The GOP used to support this until about 30 years ago. Just like they were captured in foreign policy by the neocons whose sole goal is to protect Israel, the GOP succumbed to the free trader ideology.

      For what it is worth, I supported the free trade at first. I thought Ross Perot was exaggerating on NAFTA. But when I saw the effects of what it was doing, I changed my mind.

      One final thing Vitor. I only oppose free trade, not trade among nations. I know it might sound like I am picky, but there is a huge difference. Free trade is ultimately that which is practiced among the 50 US states. That is it allows the free movement of goods, services, capital AND LABOR. The ultimate goal of the free trade movement is to have that type of trade arrangement among nations. That is part of the reason why the GOP does very little to enforce our border. They actually believe the free movement of labor is good for the economy.

    • Matthew Jacobs says:

      “Israel has an well educated population, high tech and **nukes**. Why spoil them when they are perfectly capable of handling themselves”?
      _____________________________________________.
      .
      It’s because they have Nukes that we need to keep them close. The last thing this world needs is Israel enemies thinking that Israel is now outside our protective umbrella. They might let their little head do the thinking and try and attempt the finial solution part 2. If that happens Nuclear War is to possible. NOT GOOD

      • 11 Bravo says:

        I think a lot of conservatives need to go back and read George Washington’s farewell address.

        • Matthew Jacobs says:

          That was given before the possibility of ThermoNuclear War Right?

          • 11 Bravo says:

            And it is still very relevant today. Of course most people today have little use for Washington’s advice, or our Constitution for that matter.

            But getting to your point, how does thermonuclear war, or the threat of it, trump Washington’s advice? Washington’s advice was about not allowing foreign nations to exercise too much control over American politics. As Pat Buchanan once said, “Capitol Hill is Israeli occupied territory”. There is no doubt the Israel Lobby is one of the most formidable in town.

            Following your logic would mean that we should put India and Pakistan and other nuclear powers under our umbrella so as to not allow any conflicts to escalate to the nuclear level.

        • Sam-Hec says:

          yeesh that’s too much (and too hard) reading for most americans, conservative or liberal. Though it is good reading. Not allowing outside powers into one’s own domain (however those are defined) has always been good advice.

          It may or may not be trumped by the threat of Nuclear War, as there has never been such a test to Life on Earth™ of that nature. Even a small nuclear exchange unto cities would deliver ozone depleting soot to the stratosphere, ruining agriculture and thus civilization for everyone.

          Any group with such power even if in limited use is already in everyone else’s domains. No easy way out of that dance.

  • Nadnerbus says:

    So this is how Alec Baldwin felt in 2000…

    For what it’s worth, I very much agree with this:

    “I don’t think that personal social issues such as gay marriage, abortion, and religion should be considered important political issues, by either the candidates, the parties, or the voters. Start ignoring that stuff and worry about the real issues of national government.”

    If for no other reason than electability, Republicans really need to get down to core governing principles if they want to have a hope of standing athwart and all that.

  • Matthew says:

    Much like the Church, the GOP needs to be more pragmatic. Times have changed, issues and viewpoints have changed, technology has changed, and the party needs to realize that some of the stuff it does (like bashing someone for playing WoW) will only work against it.

    • Matthew Jacobs says:

      It appears the Catholic Church’s had little impact on the vote. It seems people continue to vote for benefits. Church membership continues to drop and the only thing that could stop this trend is a direct video Remote feed from Hell.

      • Matthew says:

        I agree, I just chose to use it as a convenient example of an institution that tries to do good but instead of adopting to the times, tries to dig in it’s heels instead.

  • Michael says:

    I was quite upset at the outcome of the election, Wednesday was not a good day for me. I got over that really quick. Moping around does no good we need to stand up for what we believe in more so now than ever. What is even more grievous to me is to hear the Republican party and conservatives talking about all the things we need to do to win over certain groups of people. Romney got around 3 million less votes from Republicans than McCain, and McCain was not the most conservative candidate ever. Some Republicans and all the liberal media would want us to think we lost because we were not moderate enough that we were too conservative. Nothing could be farther from the truth. We lost because we were not conservatives enough. You should know you are on the wrong track when you are talking about doing what MSNBC says you need to do to win. As for changing the party’s views on gay marriage, abortion, and religion. If you think the few votes you will get is worth the 50 million Evangelicals and Catholics you would lose then ok go for it but the math just doesn’t add up.

  • Matthew Jacobs says:

    It is hard to vote Santa Claus out

  • jaymaster says:

    I’m not so pessimistic. I see 4 more years of NOTHING. And I like that

    Well, at least 2 more years. The vast majority of damage done by Obama happened during his first 2 years when the Dems controlled the House and the Senate. And even then, it wasn’t O, it was mostly Nancy Pelosi and Harry Reid calling the shots, with O nodding on in approval.

    When the Tea Party cut off Nancy’s balls in 2010, things changed drastically. And we’re still there now.

    So I’m kinda looking forward to at least 2 more years of stalemate/gridlock/federal incompetence. IMO, Obama isn’t going to suddenly grow a set. He’s just going to vote “present”.

    It’s up to the rest of us to figure out how to get this country back on track. And as long as they’re paralyzed, we have a chance.

Comments Closed