Squad maneuver training

U.S. Army Soldiers, assigned to Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, engage a target from a M113A2 armored vehicle during squad maneuver training at Grafenwoehr Training Area on Jan. 14, 2013. The Soldiers of 1-4 Infantry are U.S. Army Europe's professional opposing force for training at the 7th Army Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany. They routinely hone their skills at Grafenwoehr's multi-functional live-fire facilities. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sergeant Pablo N. Piedra

U.S. Army Soldiers, assigned to Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, engage a target from a M113A2 armored vehicle during squad maneuver training at Grafenwoehr Training Area on Jan. 14, 2013. The Soldiers of 1-4 Infantry are U.S. Army Europe’s professional opposing force for training at the 7th Army Joint Multinational Readiness Center in Hohenfels, Germany. They routinely hone their skills at Grafenwoehr’s multi-functional live-fire facilities. U.S. Army photo by Staff Sergeant Pablo N. Piedra

Comments

  1. *sigh* THAT takes me back. Right down to the Jolly Roger flying on the whip antenna.

    Thanks for that.

  2. Funny. When I happened upon the pic the first thing I thought of was “I think GL spent some time in that neck of the woods…”

  3. Yeah, tweeeennnnnttttyyyy… let’s see… carry the one… twenty one years ago was my last Graf rotation. That was when we still had Cobras with TOWs, fer chrissakes.

    But everyone who served in a maneuver unit in the FRG went to Graf and Hohenfels at least once (and more likely several times).

    I bet that adds up to millions of guys, over the decades. You think?

  4. U.S. Army Soldiers, assigned to Bravo Company, 1st Battalion, 4th Infantry Regiment, engage a target from a M113A2 armored vehicle during squad maneuver training at Grafenwoehr Training Area on Jan. 14, 2013.

    That’s an M113A3, not an M113A2. The only US-operated M113 Gavin with external fuel cells (i.e., fuel tanks) on the rear sponsons are ‘A3s.

    This is an M113A2. Note that there are no fuel cells on the rear sponsons;
    http://www.primeportal.net/apc/carl_dennis/m113a2/

    This is an M113A3, and you can see the fuel cells quite clearly;
    http://www.primeportal.net/apc/don_busack/m113a3/

    Finally, this graphic details all the changes made in the ‘A3 from the’A2, including the fuel cells;
    http://www.fas.org/man/dod-101/sys/land/m113a3-upgrade.gif

    I know that it’s not easy to discern an ‘A2 from an ‘A1, but the external fuel cells are a smoking gun for the ‘A3.

  5. I’m not going to google this and I’m just going to throw it out there, I thought all M113’s (except for maybe some mortar or air defense ones) were long retired by the U.S. and replaced by Bradley’s.

    1. These are opposing force guys, so they use a variety of equipment that might not be standard in regular units. Some of the other here will correct me if I’m wrong, but I believe this is what they call an OPFOR Surrogate Vehicle.

      Besides that, though, there are still a lot of M113s in service in support roles. Command post vehicles, cargo haulers, medical, etc. It’s a solid design.

      1. Hey peep the wiki on M113. Look at all the foreign sales/operators. wow. And some clever variants too- the Lithuanian wrecker is a neat idea.

        M577s had it all over ‘113s because you could stand up in them- no scoliosis victims there.

        The box structure on the deck next to the driver’s hatch is a cradle for a generator. We ran it when the vehicle was off to preserve battery power (which was notoriously crappy particularly in the cold) to run radios, lights, heaters, etc. Our SOP had us remove the generator and place it x-meters from the vehicle when we ran it. It took several guys to manhandle the thing up and out of the cradle and down the front of the vehicle.

        Oh, and the driver could only see from 12:00 to 9:00 when driving. The generator cradle blocked everything to the left, and the raised deck blocked behind. Definitely a team effort to move the thing safely.

        1. “The generator cradle blocked everything to the left”

          Sorry, to the RIGHT. From the driver’s hatch in a ‘577 you couldn’t see to your RIGHT.

          No wonder I smashed up all those curbs…

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