HH-60 Pave Hawks

HH-60 Pave Hawks from the 33rd Rescue Squadron, 943rd Rescue Group and Japan Air Self-Defense Force, fly in formation during exercise Keen Sword 17, Nov. 7, 2016, near Okinawa, Japan. The U.S.-Japan mutual security treaty allows the U.S. to provide forward-based forces that can rapidly react to counter aggression against Japan and other allies. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Stephen G. Eigel)

HH-60 Pave Hawks from the 33rd Rescue Squadron, 943rd Rescue Group and Japan Air Self-Defense Force, fly in formation during exercise Keen Sword 17, Nov. 7, 2016, near Okinawa, Japan. The U.S.-Japan mutual security treaty allows the U.S. to provide forward-based forces that can rapidly react to counter aggression against Japan and other allies. (U.S. Air Force photo/Senior Airman Stephen G. Eigel)

Comments

  1. From the photos I’ve seen the Japanese seem to use those shoulder mounted external tanks much more than US operators of the Black Hawk variants. The only US operators I’ve noticed that routinely use those extra tanks are the Army’s HH-60M medevac helos.

    It also appears that the Japanese use ‘stubby’ pylons that only have room from one hard point while the US Army uses longer pylons that have two hard points.

    Japanese stub wings – https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/5/53/UH-60J.JPG

    US stub wings – http://www.nbg-mil-com.de/Airfield%20Feucht/but-T%20Peery%20UH-60%20with%20ESSS.jpg

  2. After more reading it turns out that the larger wings were the original add on option. But if all 4 hard points where used, the door gunners could not see or fire. So that is why they came out with the stubby wings like the ones the Japanese are using. It also explains why most US Army black hawks with the original stub wings don’t utilize the inboard stations so as to not obscure the view of the door gunners.

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