USS Franklin turret in flames

View of the after 5"/38 twin gun mount of the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Franklin (CV-13) burning, as her crew tried to control fires on 19 March 1945. The carrier had been hit by a Japanese air attack while operating off the coast of Japan. Photographed from USS Santa Fe (CL-60), which extinguished the fire in this gun mount by playing streams of water through the mount's open door. Later, the other 5"/38 twin gun mount also burned.

View of the after 5″/38 twin gun mount of the U.S. Navy aircraft carrier USS Franklin (CV-13) burning, as her crew tried to control fires on 19 March 1945. The carrier had been hit by a Japanese air attack while operating off the coast of Japan. Photographed from USS Santa Fe (CL-60), which extinguished the fire in this gun mount by playing streams of water through the mount’s open door. Later, the other 5″/38 twin gun mount also burned.

Comments

  1. CV-13 and CV-17 Bunker Hill (which took a bad kamikaze hit as well) were both repaired during the war and then sent to the Naval boneyard. Neither ever sailed again. Both were being held in reserve in case the SCB-27A/SCB-27C/SCB-125 mods applied to most of the Essex class could be further upgraded. Since they were essentially fresh hulls by early ’46, the thought was it would be easier to do the “Ultimate Essex” starting from them as compared to their much more tired class-mates. Alas, both went to the breakers exactly as they were in ’46.

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