Two different bridges – One to build, one to blow

Moms find spiritual friends in Faith Club

Instapundit links to this USA Today story about the women who wrote the book The Faith Club: A Muslim, A Christian, A Jew– Three Women Search for Understanding and writes:

It’s easy to make fun of this kind of earnest, can’t-we-all-get-along stuff, but in fact it’s exactly what we need.

This immediately reminded me of the recent incident in Iraq where Muslim women went to church with Christians to provide a bit of protection following the mass hysteria over the Pope’s recent comments. (The fact that the terrorists don’t seem to mind causing “collateral damage” doesn’t discount this gesture. In fact, it makes it even more amazing.)

In short, we need this. A lot of this. A worldwide dose of this. Unless we get it, there will be no peace.

But it’s important that we don’t mistake this sort of thing, which can only occur at the moderate level, with the effort to defeat the jihadists (of all flavors) who either

A) Cannot be convinced to forsake their one-track minded interpretation of their faith, or
B) Are only using their faith as a means to a political end.

We can (and should) grow apple trees and honey bees and snow-white turtle doves with those of different faiths and cultures who are willing to act like responsible members of civilized society. We don’t do enough of that, and we need to start.

However, it would be fatal to mistake such worthy bridge-building efforts for a sound policy of defeating the enemies of civilization. Those that are committed to imposing their perverted interpretations of justice upon the rest of us must be destroyed. Dialogue is useless. Deal-making is worse. Here’s what I’m talking about.

Even the USA Today article touches on this:

Everywhere they go, people who already have heard of the book say they want to start their own clubs.

There are stumbling blocks, however. Will everyone be as open, as bold, as willing to press on with these women’s mantra of absolute honesty, constantly asking one another, “What do you really think?”

For anyone who reads the Quran or the Bible literally, rather than metaphorically or in cultural context, the women say, their views will be too liberal. For people who believe there is exactly one way to one heaven, described and delineated only by their own faith, The Faith Club may not offer a template.

“May not offer a template?” May not?

I’ve said before that this war is, in many ways, a rear-guard holding action while the global Muslim civil war resolves itself. We’re basically trying to hold things together while the honey bees pollinate the apple trees and all. That’s admittedly a bit simplistic and Western, but it certainly seems to be the case most of the time. It’s nice to see moderates playing nice, and I wish we’d see more of it. But that doesn’t change the fact that many of these folks are brutal murderous thugs who have devoted their earthly time to wiping out all that we value.

Comments

  1. The Muslim-Christian culture clash has been going on for a over a well 1000 years. I don’t think some touchy-feely sessions between old housewives changes anything.

  2. Well said Steve, Despite what the ‘peace-makers’ say the reality is in the hands of the ‘life-takers’. Tribal conflict is, has been and always will be the cornerstone of ‘The survival instinct’! Animals (I include humans) are genetically disposed to destroy any and all threats, perceived or real.

  3. There’s one big stumbling block that I can see to this- ‘For anyone who reads the Quran or the Bible literally, rather than metaphorically or in cultural context, the women say, their views will be too liberal.’ The point is that Islam doesn’t have a tradition of an ‘interpretive’ Koran- according to the tenets of the faith, the Koran is the exact word of God. There’s no room for metaphorical or cultural contexts. Anyone who says otherwise is considered an apostate. And we all know how that goes. We want a particular, modern view of the Koran to come into being- when we hear of moderate Muslims, what we’re really talking about are Muslims who don’t believe the frequent passages of the Koran calling for them to spread Islam and Sharia and subjugate infidels. There’s there’s the Koran stating that Muslims should not take Jews and Christians as friends. A bit of a hurdle too. I think the only way that a moderate or reformed Islam, which takes the Koran to be just a book and not the precise word of God, might happen is if the faith schisms- and when that happens the fundamentalists will no doubt turn all their murderous rage on the other side. And wit6 no central authortity and thousands of clerics creating fatwas at will it’s hard to see how Islam will progress. Any reformist branch will have to start out tiny [I keep hearing about a tiny minority of extremists but it seems the ‘moderates’ are much harder to find] and somehow convince the others of their faith to abandon the previous thousand years of their religion- and do it without being driven into hiding by the threats of the findamentalists. Even at that, there’s a heck of a lot of material in the book advocating war on infidels for the moderates to explain away.

  4. I think the only way that a moderate or reformed Islam, which takes the Koran to be just a book and not the precise word of God, might happen is if the faith schisms– and when that happens the fundamentalists will no doubt turn all their murderous rage on the other side. And wit6 no central authortity and thousands of clerics creating fatwas at will it’s hard to see how Islam will progress.’ This is, I believe, what is happening. I call it a Muslim civil war and it’s just barely started. It will change the world. One way or another.