Advertising on the Armed Forces Network

Charlie at Op-For:

Why AFN must continually broadcast messages about alcohol abuse to troops living under the prohibitionist General Order #1 confuses me greatly. Are there bars on the base camp that I just haven’t been able to track down yet?

and

Also, for a military that must live under –don’t ask, don’t tell” rules, –Will & Grace” is on every night on AFN.

Read the rest: AFN- WTF?

Comments

  1. I spent Christmas 1990 at the Aramco complex with some Americans who we met early on and who had invited us to stay with them on both Thanksgiving and Christmas. It was great, and they had prepared for our visit by triple distilling their traditional ‘white’ and ‘brown’ liquor, which approximated vodka (actually very potent grain alcohol) and whiskey or bourbon. the funniest, most absurd thing about it was the phone call I made to family gathered at my brother’s house at 0200 my time, Christmas day. It was Christmas eve back home, and my brother did not allow alcohol in his house. So there I am at 2 in the morning, in Saudi Arabia, one of the strictest nations on earth, holding a ‘white’ and tonic, talking to a bunch of sober, teetotaling family members back home in the decadent, liberal United State. What a trip.

  2. Why AFN must continually broadcast messages about alcohol abuse to troops living under the prohibitionist General Order #1 confuses me greatly. Are there bars on the base camp that I just haven’t been able to track down yet? Certain quota of ‘don’t do this’ adverts that they must run? To – I don’t know what conditions are like vis alcohol these days but I served with a guy whose brother was in Saudi in ’91. Every week the deployed brother received Brasso – many many cans of Brasso – direct from the PX at Camp Kinser. Direct with a detour to the barracks to empty the noxious fluid and replace it with something offensive to Saudi sensibilities but which was like liquid gold to the guys in the sandbox. Where there is a will there will be booze.

  3. They must have changed the name, it used to be called Armed Forces Radio & Television Service(AFRTS), or as we liked to call it, ‘A FARTS. I only listened to the radio shows during the run up to the Gulf War, they started out lame and then got progressively better and funnier, taking on a Good Morning, Vietnam quality. I actually wouldn’t mind getting some tapes of some of the broadcasts I listened to, but I doubt they archived any of that stuff.

  4. Apparently everyone needs reminding, or educating, as the case may be: AFN broadcasts to Europe and the Pacific, and last time I was downrange there was no AFN-SWAsia channel so any ads they’re seeing (and I heartily agree they’re quite lame) are meant for general, not specific, consumption. Go ask Sgt Mom over at SgtStryker if you like, I believe she spent her career with AFRTS (which is still around). AFN radio can be different, mind you. In Europe the AFN radio stations are locally produced and so are many of the ads, not that this helps matters much.