F-16s in a sand storm

Two F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 332nd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron wait out a haboob, Sept. 9, 2008. Haboobs are sandstorms that result from the collapse of thunderstorms and the resulting downdrafts. The dust carried by a haboob can rise several kilometers in the sky, and winds can travel upwards of 30 mph. The F-16 in the foreground is deployed from the Air National Guard\'s 174th Fighter Wing, based in Syracuse, N.Y. The F-16 in the background is deployed from the South Dakota ANG\'s 114th FW.

Two F-16 Fighting Falcons from the 332nd Expeditionary Fighter Squadron wait out a haboob, Sept. 9, 2008. Haboobs are sandstorms that result from the collapse of thunderstorms and the resulting downdrafts. The dust carried by a haboob can rise several kilometers in the sky, and winds can travel upwards of 30 mph. The F-16 in the foreground is deployed from the Air National Guard's 174th Fighter Wing, based in Syracuse, N.Y. The F-16 in the background is deployed from the South Dakota ANG's 114th FW.

Comments

  1. The great thing about the F-16 is how much capability you get from what is a relatively cheap plane as jet fighters go. It may not be that advanced but it can do a lot. Looks pretty cool too, IMO.

  2. That sand blowing around must do some damage to the planes, like etching the cockpit canopy or damaging the turbofan blades. You’d think they’d be covered down.

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