Battlewagon Wednesday

USS Nebraska (BB 14) coaling near Veracruz. 1916.

USS Nebraska (BB 14) coaling near Veracruz. 1916.

Displacement: 16,094 tons
Length: 441’3″
Beam: 76’2″
Draft: 25’10”
Speed: 19 knots
Complement: 1,108
Armament:

  • 4x 12″ guns
  • 8x 8″ guns
  • 12x 6″ guns
  • 11x 3″ guns
  • 4x 21″ torpedo tubes

Class: Virginia

The Nebraska was launched in 1904 and decommissioned in 1920. Found via Naval & Nautical Blog.

Battlewagon Wednesday at Murdoc Online

More battlewagons below!

USS Texas (BB-35) Making 15.151 knots during the 9th run of her standardization trials, 23 October 1913. Note incomplete status of her hull paint forward and unfinished mainmast. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

USS Texas (BB-35) Making 15.151 knots during the 9th run of her standardization trials, 23 October 1913. Note incomplete status of her hull paint forward and unfinished mainmast. U.S. Naval Historical Center Photograph.

I’ve got a request from a reader looking for hull lines of the as-built USS Texas (BB 35) for some detailed CAD drawings he’s working on. He’s also looking for information on the doors in the superstructure as they are covered by boats in the drawings he has.

If you’ve got detailed info about this sort of thing or know someone who does, let me know and I’ll put you in touch with the modeler.

Battlewagon Wednesday at Murdoc Online

USS Arizona: Warship, Tomb, Monument by Mackinnon Simpson

USS Arizona: Warship, Tomb, Monument
by Mackinnon Simpson

The story of the USS Arizona encompasses far more than the milli-second BOOM! that split her hull and snuffed out the lives of 1177 men aboard her. The huge battleship led a fascinating life before her demise, and–as a poignant symbol of the attack that thrust the United States into World War II–has impacted millions of lives since. She lays where she sank, in the silt of Pearl Harbor, spanned now by a graceful white memorial that pays tribute to her dead. MacKinnon Simpson’s newest book, USS Arizona – Warship, Tomb, Monument, pays tribute to the ship, her crews, and her symbolism through the years. Packed with many rarely-before seen images, the book includes such unlikely characters as Elvis Presley, whose benefit concert helped trigger the fund-raising for the Memorial, and Henry Williams, a three-year-old boy who placed the first bolt in her keel in 1915 and read a newspaper by the light of her raging fires as a lieutenant at Pearl Harbor in 1941. USS Arizona – Warship, Tomb, Monument tells a story that needed to be told, of why the Arizona is still so important to people from around the world who trek to visit her each year.

I haven’t had a chance to check out this book, but the review here makes it sound like a good one.

Battlewagon Wednesday at Murdoc Online

16″/50 Gun and Turret Training Film

httpv://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0OmOQs0ziSU

More battlewagons next Wednesday!

Comments

  1. I like the idea of the new ‘battleship Wednesday’. I’m an addict on cage masted battleships and build radio-controlled 1/96 scale U.S. battleships prior to WWII. My favorate is the California (BB-44) and I am currently working on the Texas (BB-35). i use CAD to draw my plans, usually based on actual navy plans.

  2. You do realize that now you are going to have to have “the conversation” again, right? Let’s start it by saying this. Which would you rather have for coastal fire support, 1 5″ fast firing gun, or 9 16″ guns?

  3. I’m gambling that if I keep posting battleship stuff every week, commenters will grow tired of debating that every single time.

    I estimate that it will only take 40-50 weeks before the novelty of it wears off…

  4. To keep things in perspective, don’t forget that these ships were supplied by wagons pulled by horses and mules. And railroads, of course.

    Those were some impressive feats.

  5. Also worthy of note is that the speed of the unrep listed in the caption of the picture has remained unchanged even to this day. 13-14 knots remains the gold standard.

Comments are closed