Stryker with slat armor

strykercage.jpg

It’s ugly, but the “cage” is designed to detonate RPG warheads before they reach the hull of the vehicle. We’ll see. (via Strategy Page)

Comments

  1. *Snort* If it actually works properly (and without buggering up the vehicle even further), I’ll sacrifice a chicken to the people at General Dynamics (or GM Canada, or whoever actually manufactures the bloody thing). ***

  2. Actually, I’ve heard of this exact thing working very well in the past. Low tech solutions are often the best solutions. ***

  3. Yes, low-tech solutions ARE often the best solutions. I’m not arguing that at all. I certainly hope it works. This contraption just gives the anti-Stryker folks, and there are a LOT of them, something else to poke fun at. You don’t need a picket fence on an M1, etc. As an observation/question, why is it that when Iraqi or other third-world soldiers use low-tech methods to neutralize our advanced weaponry, they’re hailed as geniuses, but if WE use simple methods it’s a reason to ridicule? ***

  4. Yes, low-tech solutions ARE often the best solutions. I’m not arguing that at all. I certainly hope it works. This contraption just gives the anti-Stryker folks, and there are a LOT of them, something else to poke fun at. You don’t need a picket fence on an M1, etc. As an observation/question, why is it that when Iraqi or other third-world soldiers use low-tech methods to neutralize our advanced weaponry, they’re hailed as geniuses, but if WE use simple methods it’s a reason to ridicule? ***

  5. Yes, low-tech solutions ARE often the best solutions. I’m not arguing that at all. I certainly hope it works. This contraption just gives the anti-Stryker folks, and there are a LOT of them, something else to poke fun at. You don’t need a picket fence on an M1, etc. As an observation/question, why is it that when Iraqi or other third-world soldiers use low-tech methods to neutralize our advanced weaponry, they’re hailed as geniuses, but if WE use simple methods it’s a reason to ridicule? ***

  6. Hrm..Dear I cannot believe you sleep in that thing!! Poor thang!!! I’ll give you a bed to take back with you when you go =( (yes I know sad to say that you do have to go back) Love ya!!

  7. As with any ‘tech solution’ all it takes is kid in a basement window or ditch with a RPG and the bellie is fair game. The buildings that are above the deck line offer open shot to the roof. The cage only changes the direction the shooters come from. Now- new varients of the RPG come with the stand off probe like most other modern HEAT rounds, and the tandum war heads that are used. How has the slat armor held up to the new RPG? Is would be interesting to compare results.

  8. Mike: There were several cases of direct RPG hits defeated by the slat armor. One Stryker was lost to an RPG, but the official story is that the debris from the a defeated warhead set a gas can on fire. Yes, the belly and the top of the vehicle are not protected by the slat armor, but armor is always a ‘play the percentages’ game. This slat armor takes away most of the easy shots. In urban settings, of course, roofs and upper-story windows provide more opportunity for shots from above, but this vulnerability isn’t unique to the Stryker. All armored vehicles have less armor on top.

  9. They do have the right idea by adding a cage but they’ve got the details wrong. Look at older pictures from WWII rails between the uprights are too narrow and too far apart, they should be flatter and closer together, I’m not saying you’d fire between them from half a mile away but most of these fights in Iraq are taking place within about 75 yards or less of the vehicle and the old smaller diameter RPG rounds will slide between. Also there’s a fairly good way to get the same result without adding all that width to the vehicle. Simple boxes cut and tack welded back together from standard steel or aluminum sheet with blow off panels on top and filled with water. Was sopposedly used successfully during both WWII and Korea. When HEAT rounds hit the panel the water disrupts the stream by exploding into steam. Still they shouldn’t have gone wheeled. You NEED tracks in a city, both for manueverability and a smaller turning circle and to deal with obstructions, barricades, and rubble wheels can’t climb over.

  10. The slat-armor package has been hit several times from all sides with a wide aray of rounds. Not only the older RPGs but some newer stuff and did very well, just ask the crew members who survived the 500 pond car bomb detonated withih four feet of there vehicle. Lots of frag but no debris of any size came thru the slat armor package. I know that it has been tested because I have seen the results, the weapons and the people who have put there brains,sweat and lots of hours into this project. Believe me, if you guys can think of i, it has probably already been adressed.

  11. I think this is a great example of battlefield improvisation. It is this kind of flexible mentality, and ability to quickly improvise that wins wars. This may be belaboring a point, but the Rhodesians were good at this in the 70s and 80s. Rhodesia was a largely rural country with economic centers separated by long un-securable bush roads. The roads became an easy target for ZANU/ZAPU guerrillas. They could mine the roads and ambush vehicles and economically cripple the country. The Rhodesians came up with innovative improvisational ways to protect their vehicles. They started by taking existing vehicle chassis, such as the Unimog, or standard 5 ton diesel truck. They would strip the body off leaving the just the engine, frame, and transmission. To this they would attach an armored body. Usually the new body/hull was of the ‘V’shape to deflect blast shock waves. The hull usually had a roll cage, firing ports, and an opening to let blast pressure escape as well as seats with shock absorbers to lessen the blast-waves impact on the body. They also filled the tires with water again to dissipate and absorb the blast wave. The armored vehicles they created within a few weeks, greatly decreased the number of people killed by mines. So much so that the only mine casualties were a result of secondary vehicle accidents as a result of vehicle rolls and loss of visibility. Once they lowered vehicle speeds and added 5 point harnessing on the seats, deaths from vehicle mines became almost nil. It is good to see that the US Army with it’s large and bureaucratic acquisition process still leaves soldiers room to improvise. Tim Reed

  12. Just wanted to point out that Rhodesia also had the Selaus scouts. Trained hardened troops that took out their guerrillas in bunches.

  13. This is in reference to Arthur’s post below: They do have the right idea by adding a cage but they’ve got the details wrong. Look at older pictures from WWII rails between the uprights are too narrow and too far apart, they should be flatter and closer together, I’m not saying you’d fire between them from half a mile away but most of these fights in Iraq are taking place within about 75 yards or less of the vehicle and the old smaller diameter RPG rounds will slide between. Also there’s a fairly good way to get the same result without adding all that width to the vehicle. Simple boxes cut and tack welded back together from standard steel or aluminum sheet with blow off panels on top and filled with water. Was sopposedly used successfully during both WWII and Korea. When HEAT rounds hit the panel the water disrupts the stream by exploding into steam. Still they shouldn’t have gone wheeled. You NEED tracks in a city, both for manueverability and a smaller turning circle and to deal with obstructions, barricades, and rubble wheels can’t climb over. Posted by: arthur at August 16, 2004 10:41 PM Nice thought, however the slat armor is designed to very specific specs and your ideas to modify (closer together, etc…would not work. I have an uncle in a high level position in the know on this. When I was in Iraq, he asked me specificly if I knew of anyone modifying or creating their own slat armor and if so, to tell them to stop IMEDIATELY! Apparently, ‘homemade’ slat armor not onlyis highly ineffective, but can and ofter WILL OPTIMIZE, NOT defeat the RPG’s effects. Trust the higher ups on this one. Thank God it works as well as it does the way it is designed now. As newer armor is produced, then survivability will increase even more. Hell, I survived both an IED and RPG attack on my M1114 UpArmored HMMWV. I’d STILL want slat armor on it if that was a possibility!

  14. The slat armour takes the ‘shape’ out of the shaped charge warhead; if the RPG hits between the slats, the slats will deform the warhead, reducing the explosive effect by the air space. If the RPG does hit a solid piece of the armour, air space keeps the occupants safe. Light weight, effective.

  15. In Vietnam, the Mobile Riverine force used reinforced steel bars (‘re-bar’) used for common concrete reinforcement to surround the hulls of landing craft in a cage similar to the slat system; so it is old ‘technology.’ I undestand from a recent VIP briefing on the Stryker here in Hawaii that the the original requirements were to have a reactive armor that would foil an RPG. However the system failed. Now this high tech vehicle has to have a birdgage slat system to resist attacks with an old, simple weapon (the RPG) found throughout the world. If the above is true, the Army bought a pig in a poke. Smells like a procurement scandal.