Yah, Camel!

An Australian Light Armoured Vehicle waits behind a camel train during a patrol through the Baluchi Valley, southern Afghanistan. (Date taken: 26 November 2008)

An Australian Light Armoured Vehicle waits behind a camel train during a patrol through the Baluchi Valley, southern Afghanistan. (Date taken: 26 November 2008)

I keep wondering why no one but the US Army uses slat armor on their LAVs.

UPDATE: Several readers have pointed out that Australian LAVs in Iraq did use slat armor. More on the ASLAV here.

Comments

  1. My first thought was “Aussies think camels are LAVs?”

    Good question, though. The Aussies, Canadians, and Marines take their LAVs places they get shot at with RPGS … no idea why they haven’t adopted the practice.

    Some Marine will probably chime in to point out that Strykers aren’t LAVs.

  2. … no one but the US Army …

    The army does not operate LAV-25s. I recall that the Airborne was interested in the LAV-25 but I have no idea if they ever bought any.

    uses slat armor on their LAVs.

    Too heavy. Or at least so I recall but I am not the authoritative voice for vehicle armor.

    Some Marine will probably chime in to point out that Strykers aren’t LAVs.

    Hi there!

  3. Yeah, yeah, yeah…

    The Marine LAVs have fewer horsepower but are lighter, giving similar performance to a Stryker. The Canadian, Australian, and New Zealand LAVs are very close to Strykers, all being LAV III generation vehicles.

    I think the armor protection level for all of them is roughly equal.

    I just find it curious that the Army decided to go 100% slat armor on all Strykers while no one else seems to think they need to.

    Have I mentioned that I STILL think the Army should have a 25mm gun version of the Stryker?

  4. Fuck the Stryker, the Army should have a 25mm on camels for the win. Camels with 25mm, sharks with lasers then eagles with some super sharp metal claws and land, sea and air will be ruled.

  5. Vitor, your absolutely right,maybe we could get a stryker or airborne LAV with one of those laser defensive measure systems to be at aproppiate weight to be able to forget about worrying shape charges will cut through light armor

  6. Well, camels don’t get flat tires, or need a supply train of parts and petrol to keep them running. Find them water, and some scrub to forage on, and they just keep going. Plus, you can’t eat an LAV when your rations run out. Maybe they should look into slat armor for their camels.

  7. “Well, camels don’t get flat tires, or need a supply train of parts and petrol to keep them running. Find them water….”

    Ya, but don’t forget you gotta “brick” them after finding them the water.

  8. ASLAVs are not LAV IIIs, they’re the same as USMC LAVs with different tyres.
    In Iraq they did operate with bar armour as OBG-W and MNF-I south components, and SECDET (the australian security detatchment in the green zone, comprising inf, cav and SOF elements) still did at least as late as Q4 2007.

  9. The last picture you had of aussie LAV25’s (going home from iraq) had slat armour,
    so i suppose they don’t think they need it in Afghanistan.

    Of course they have anti-spall on the inside.’

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