Javelin

Lance Cpl. Jed Bolyard, 22, an infantryman from College Point, N.Y., fires the Javelin missile during an exercise near Al Asad Air Base, Iraq, Dec. 8. Bolyard is with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 5. The Javelin shoot was one small part of a larger combined-arms exercise, which integrated traditional infantry elements with aviation, mortars and several anti-armor systems. ID: 135403 Date Taken: December 8th, 2008 Location: AL ASAD AIR BASE, IQ Photographer: Capt. Paul Greenberg

Lance Cpl. Jed Bolyard, 22, an infantryman from College Point, N.Y., fires the Javelin missile during an exercise near Al Asad Air Base, Iraq, Dec. 8. Bolyard is with Weapons Company, 2nd Battalion, 25th Marine Regiment, Regimental Combat Team 5. The Javelin shoot was one small part of a larger combined-arms exercise, which integrated traditional infantry elements with aviation, mortars and several anti-armor systems. ID: 135403 Date Taken: December 8th, 2008 Location: AL ASAD AIR BASE, IQ Photographer: Capt. Paul Greenberg

Comments

  1. It’s amazing how little smoke and flame there is from the ejection charge. I guess it’s designed that way to avoid giving away the launcher position, but still amazing.

    1. The picture is photoshoped i can tell because…
      1. The missile has no motion lines.
      2. Look at the soldiers shaddow and the missiles shaddow they are diffrent angles

  2. Id say that disposable or hand-held re-loadable rocket launchers are more efficient than hand=held missiles in that they’re less expensive and less invasive on the weight of combat loads and that they’re less important if you lose one, your eto isn’t pissed if you drop an AT4 during an ambush, or if some ass hole steals your rounds for your M26

  3. From some website-

    “The propulsion section consists of the launch and flight motors.
    The launch motor propels the missile out of the LTA. It provides the initial force to push the missile a safe distance from the gunner before the flight motor ignites to ensure the gunner’s safety. The launch motor is completely spent by the time the missile clears the LTA, this accounts for the low signature after launch.

    The flight motor powers the missile to the target during flight. It ignites when the missile is a safe distance from the gunner, protecting the gunner from hot exhaust gases generated when the motor fires.”

    Nifty.

  4. @Nicholas: The main goal of the ejection charge is to enable the Javelin to be launched from enclosed areas. You need a lot more room to fire an AT4 because of the large backblast.

    @derrderr420: The AT4 and the Javelin actually have very different purposes. You don’t destroy enemy tanks with AT4’s. In the FM for it, it states that in order to destroy an MBT you should plan on using volley fire with several AT4’s and aim for the sides or rear. It’s more on a light, disposable anti-APC and light vehicle weapon that can also be used against bunkers, concentrations of enemy personnel, etc. The Javelin is a dedicated anti-armor weapon. Instead of launching directly at a target, it obtains a missile lock on it and launches upwards, then arcs down to penetrate the top armor.

    They’re weapons with very different uses and purposes, which is why you find two Javelin teams in the weapons section of an infantry rifle platoon, whereas individual soldiers may happen to carry AT4’s with them in the rifle squads but it’s not anybody’s designated job. It’s like a replacement for the LAW.

  5. Hmm, it looks like there is still some burning fuel despite the fact it’s cleared the launcher but isn’t far enough away to safely engage the flight motor. I suppose you could argue that the launch motor is “spent” but there’s still a bit of fuel left burning, just enough to be visible. It’s also possible that what we’re seeing is merely hot glowing parts as a result of the rapid burning of the launch motor.

  6. hi, I may only be a kid but I know a lot about future weapons. Javelin is a fire-and-forget missile with lock-on before launch and automatic self-guidance. The system takes a top-attack flight profile against armored vehicles (attacking the top armor which is generally thinner) but can also take a direct-attack mode for use against buildings or fortifications. This missile also has the ability to engage helicopters in the direct attack mode.[3] The missile reaches a peak altitude of 150 m (500 ft) in top-attack mode and 60 m in direct-fire mode. The missile is equipped with an imaging infrared seeker. The tandem warhead is fitted with two shaped charges: a precursor warhead to detonate any explosive reactive armor and a primary warhead to penetrate base armor. The Javelin was used in the 2003 Invasion of Iraq [2], with devastating effects on the Iraqi version of T-72s and Type 69 tanks.

    The missile is ejected from the launcher so that it reaches a safe distance from the operator before the main rocket motors ignite; a “soft launch arrangement”.[4] This makes it harder to identify the launcher and allows it to be fired from within buildings; however, back-blast from the launch tube still poses a hazard to nearby personnel. Thanks to this “fire and forget” system, the firing team may move on as soon as the missile has been launched.[5]

    The missile system is carried most often by a two man team consisting of a gunner and an ammo bearer, although it can be fired with just one person if necessary. While the gunner aims and fires the missile, the ammo bearer scans for prospective targets and watches for threats such as enemy vehicles and troops.

Comments are closed