Dude, we got a Dell!

Maj. Rick Wageman operates the virtual cockpit of an MQ-1 Predator Oct. 25 at a base in southern Afghanistan. The remote nature of the control allows the Predator to stay airborne for longer periods of time, changing pilots periodically to reduce stress and fatigue which can lead to mission failure. Major Wageman is a 62nd Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron pilot deployed from Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Samuel Morse)

Maj. Rick Wageman operates the virtual cockpit of an MQ-1 Predator Oct. 25 at a base in southern Afghanistan. The remote nature of the control allows the Predator to stay airborne for longer periods of time, changing pilots periodically to reduce stress and fatigue which can lead to mission failure. Major Wageman is a 62nd Expeditionary Reconnaissance Squadron pilot deployed from Cannon Air Force Base, N.M. (U.S. Air Force photo/Staff Sgt. Samuel Morse)

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Comments

  1. It’s funny, I think government waste and inefficiency is a massive problem we need to address, and I also buy Dell computers both for home and my division at work (among others).

    However, I wouldn’t at all mind seeing the gov’t spending a few hundred more dollars for server-grade components on mission critical systems. To build the $399 Dell he’s flying with, a few manufacturing corners need to be cut and lower quality components need to be used. What happens when a mainboard capacitor melts mid-mission?

    My wife and I use a couple of $349 Dells as our home office computers, I would not trust them on the (remote) front lines.

  2. I’m impressed with the plywood desk tops and 2X4 computer stands. And that 60’s era lounge chair he’s sitting in too.

    That dude could be a geek in his parent’s basement anywhere in America!

  3. The difference between the geek who plays Flight Simulator and this officer.

    Well…you could play more games on the geek’s computer than this officer’s Dell.

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