Joint High Speed Vessels

First a picture:

PANAMA CITY, Panama (Dec. 22, 2008) Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Joe Davies, top left, observes Panamanian National Air and Maritime Service personnel during a Southern Partnership Station mass casualty training exercise. Southern Partnership Station is a training mission to Central America, South America and the Caribbean Basin. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Ball/Released)

PANAMA CITY, Panama (Dec. 22, 2008) Hospital Corpsman 3rd Class Joe Davies, top left, observes Panamanian National Air and Maritime Service personnel during a Southern Partnership Station mass casualty training exercise. Southern Partnership Station is a training mission to Central America, South America and the Caribbean Basin. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Daniel Ball/Released)

Notice the ship in the background. It’s the HSV-2 Swift, mentioned a number of times previously on MO. The Swift is leased by the US Navy and is currently attached to the Military Sealift Command. For a number of images showing the Swift’s rear RORO ramp, check out this post.

In November, shipbuilder Austal won a contract to built at least 10 joint high speed vessels, five for the Navy, five for the Army, and possibly more to follow.

Austal’s design is based on that of the Westpac Express (HSV-4676), not the Swift (which was built by Incat.)

Murdoc likes this move.

Comments

  1. That’s funny. Normally HSV-2 is delivered by semen, but in this case the seamen are delivered by HSV-2.

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