CV-22 Osprey

A CV-22 Osprey aircraft from the 8th Special Operations Squadron flies over the Emerald Coast outside Hurlburt Field, Fla., Jan. 31, 2009. While over the water, the crew practiced using a hoist, which is used to rescue stranded personnel. (DoD photo by Senior Airman Julianne Showalter, U.S. Air Force/Released)

A CV-22 Osprey aircraft from the 8th Special Operations Squadron flies over the Emerald Coast outside Hurlburt Field, Fla., Jan. 31, 2009. While over the water, the crew practiced using a hoist, which is used to rescue stranded personnel. (DoD photo by Senior Airman Julianne Showalter, U.S. Air Force/Released)

Comments

  1. Hey Murdoc,

    Given the Osprey’s much-publicized cost and engineering problems, do you have any idea why its developers didn’t move in the direction of the Fairey Rotodyne, that the British came out with in the late 1950s?

    Theo Spark has a good video on the Rotodyne at http://www.theospark.net/2008/03/fairey-rotodyne1950s-technology.html Wiki also has a worthwhile article.

    Seems to me the Rotodyne did everything the Osprey is supposed to do, and I don’t believe it had any flight accidents at all, let alone fatal ones. Today’s powerplants would — obviously — make it much more capable than it was when designed.

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