Boeing Unveils US Navy Paint Scheme for P-8A Poseidon

The first painted P-8A Poseidon aircraft rolls out of the paint hangar at Boeing?s [NYSE: BA] Renton, Wash., facility, displaying its new U.S. Navy livery. The aircraft, designated T-2, is the third of five test aircraft being assembled and tested as part of the System Development and Demonstration contract that Boeing received in 2004. The first test aircraft, T-1, which successfully completed the program?s first flight on April 25, will be painted in the same gray paint scheme later this summer. T-2 was painted in late April. The Navy plans to purchase 108 P-8A anti-submarine warfare aircraft to replace its fleet of P-3Cs. Initial operational capability is planned for 2013. The P-8A is built by a Boeing-led industry team that includes CFM International, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Spirit AeroSystems and GE Aviation. Boeing photo by Jim Anderson

The first painted P-8A Poseidon aircraft rolls out of the paint hangar at Boeing's (NYSE: BA) Renton, Wash., facility, displaying its new U.S. Navy livery. The aircraft, designated T-2, is the third of five test aircraft being assembled and tested as part of the System Development and Demonstration contract that Boeing received in 2004. The first test aircraft, T-1, which successfully completed the program?s first flight on April 25, will be painted in the same gray paint scheme later this summer. T-2 was painted in late April. The Navy plans to purchase 108 P-8A anti-submarine warfare aircraft to replace its fleet of P-3Cs. Initial operational capability is planned for 2013. The P-8A is built by a Boeing-led industry team that includes CFM International, Northrop Grumman, Raytheon, Spirit AeroSystems and GE Aviation. Boeing photo by Jim Anderson

The Poseidon’s first flight was last week.

UPDATE: Also, Australia signs a memorandum of understanding for cooperative development of the P-8A.

Comments

  1. Ten thousand quatloos say that the Navy never takes delivery of more then 7 P-8A’s. Instead in an orgy of cost efficiencies/perpetual vaporware development, some official decides we need to develop a common platform to perform the duties of the P-3 and KC-135’s.

  2. I agree that very few will make it to the fleet. The DoD already scrapped funding for 3 production models to help them build another DD-1000.

    It’s quite likely that Australia and India will have operational units of P-8’s in their fleets BEFORE the US Navy will, as the program currently stands.

    This whole program is a sore issue with me. LockMart could have had newly-produced and upgraded P-3’sin the fleet by now if the Navy Jet mafia hadn’t had a bug up their backside about getting the P-8.

    This is another Navy boondoggle from the broken Navy procurement system. Our failure to fix that will cost us terribly in the years to come, and in more than financial ways.

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