Shot Line

Boatswain Bobby Petree, a civilian mariner, fires a shot line to Military Sealift Command supply ship USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5) during an underway replenishment for the Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20). Comfort received food and supplies along its route to the ship\'s third stop, Antigua and Barbuda, during Continuing Promise 2009 (CP09). CP09 combines U.S. military and interagency personnel, non-governmental organizations, civil service mariners, academic and partner nations to provide medical, dental, veterinary and engineering services afloat and ashore alongside host nation personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica Snow/Released))

Boatswain Bobby Petree, a civilian mariner, fires a shot line to Military Sealift Command supply ship USNS Robert E. Peary (T-AKE 5) during an underway replenishment for the Military Sealift Command hospital ship USNS Comfort (T-AH 20). Comfort received food and supplies along its route to the ship's third stop, Antigua and Barbuda, during Continuing Promise 2009 (CP09). CP09 combines U.S. military and interagency personnel, non-governmental organizations, civil service mariners, academic and partner nations to provide medical, dental, veterinary and engineering services afloat and ashore alongside host nation personnel. (U.S. Air Force photo by Senior Airman Jessica Snow/Released))

Gotta love the M14.

Comments

  1. I’ve seen a lot of people too stupid to get out of this thing’s way shot with a giant rubber projo. Our GM’s had “kills” on their hardhats for things like Rig Captains, Safety Officers, Line Handlers, etc. 20-30 “kills” per deployment was not unusual.

    Another fun trick is to pack the stabilizing cuts in the projo with wire rope grease. When the projo hits and temporarily compresses, it shoots grease out in three distinct fans and makes holding on to it that much more interesting.

    Good times…

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