New Ships

Two Northrop Grumman-built Ships — Dewey (DDG 105) and New York (LPD 21) — Delivered On Gulf Coast in the Same Week

PASCAGOULA, Miss. and AVONDALE, La., Aug. 25, 2009 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) — Northrop Grumman Corporation (NYSE:NOC) delivered two ships to the U.S. Navy this week at its Gulf Coast shipyards in Pascagoula, Miss. and Avondale, La. Company and Navy officials signed documents officially transferring custody of the Aegis guided missile destroyer Dewey (DDG 105) in Pascagoula on Monday, Aug. 17 and the amphibious transport dock ship New York (LPD 21) at the New Orleans facility on Friday, Aug. 21.

Northrop Grumman delivered two ships to the U.S. Navy this week: the Aegis guided missile destroyer Dewey (DDG 105) in Pascagoula on Monday, Aug. 17 and the amphibious transport dock ship New York (LPD 21) at the New Orleans facility on Friday, Aug. 21.

Northrop Grumman delivered two ships to the U.S. Navy this week: the Aegis guided missile destroyer Dewey (DDG 105) in Pascagoula on Monday, Aug. 17 and the amphibious transport dock ship New York (LPD 21) at the New Orleans facility on Friday, Aug. 21.

Does that image look a little odd?

Comments

  1. It does.. why is the light shining on it so much more yellow towards the rear and around the superstructure?

  2. Nicholas:

    Cloud shadow.
    It is not a clear day.
    Put together with what sunlight is breaking thru reflecting off of shallow greenish water that you get off that part of the gulf coast…

  3. I’ve seen such an effect at sea, many times. The sun is shining through gaps in, or around the superstructure of, a ship on the sunward side of the new one. It doesn’t appear to be reflection, since the sunlight is also on the helo deck at the fantail.

  4. Yeah, I see, cloud shadow makes sense. I just wasn’t sure. I thought it could also be the shadow from a nearby ship.

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