Business Administration Training for Women’s Associations

Representatives from eight women's associations meet to discuss possible business training in the town of Qare Qosh in Ninawa province with members of the Ninawa Provincial Reconstruction Team Oct 27. Photo by 2nd Lt. Jeff Orban

Representatives from eight women's associations meet to discuss possible business training in the town of Qare Qosh in Ninawa province with members of the Ninawa Provincial Reconstruction Team Oct 27. Photo by 2nd Lt. Jeff Orban

Looks like Smalltown, USA, but is actually Mosul, Iraq:

The Ninawa Provincial Reconstruction Team has instituted a program to train women’s associations in Iraq on business administration practices.

Tony Daza, an economics advisor for the Ninawa PRT and representatives from eight women’s associations held an open dialogue Oct. 27 about the details of the training program.

This, my friends, is what victory looks like. Women sitting around a table discussing professional training programs.

“All these women have attended a lot of conferences before on empowerment, but this time they were ready for income generating programs,” said Daza…

“These women have never had access to start a business to generate income of their own,” said Daza. “Success for me with this program is giving these women choices to have their own sources of income.”

There are a lot of people who screamed and yelled and protested and pontificated for years so that these women could not do things like this. And Murdoc’s not talking about the terrorists or fundamentalists in Iraq.

Comments

  1. Dear Left wing of the U.S.,

    When you use the word “empowered,” please reference this article for proper usage.

    It’s such a PC buzzword, but in this case it actually fits and makes me feel pretty happy for these people. As opposed to “empowering” people to collect a gubmint handout.

  2. This is a stinging defeat for Reid, Pelosi and others that desperately wanted to capitalize on failure in Iraq.

    Now they’re working hard (or should I say intentionally failing to do what needs to be done) for failure in Afghanistan to boost the left.

  3. As I graduated from High School in 1954, I have seen a lot of positive advancement for women. So I am very glad for them. I have always felt they were being treated wrongly in many ways.

    Whenever I’d been able to do something in support of them I would do it. Thus, I was happy when NOW came along so I could join it and support women by doing so.

    (This made me a paratrooping, deep sea diving Card Carrying Member of NOW.)

    I was mostly responsible for getting a women promoted to a being a supervisor in a computer manufacturing company. (She was to first women in the company in that type of management position.)

    I hope to see this type of thing (and it may already be) being done in Afghanistan.

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