Light Litorral Ships

The Chilean navy Sa'ar 4-class fast-attack craft Angamos and Casma perform tactical maneuvering exercises in the Strait Of Magellan. Carl Vinson is supporting Southern Seas 2010, a U.S. Southern Command-directed operation that provides U.S. and international forces the opportunity to operate in a multi-national environment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker/Released)

The Chilean navy Sa'ar 4-class fast-attack craft Angamos and Casma perform tactical maneuvering exercises in the Strait Of Magellan. Carl Vinson is supporting Southern Seas 2010, a U.S. Southern Command-directed operation that provides U.S. and international forces the opportunity to operate in a multi-national environment. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Daniel Barker/Released)

Always sorta like the Sa’ar 4s.

Comments

  1. You know…. I’m of the opinion that a hundred of these little buggers would be a massive improvement over the dozen or so LCS’ the Navy is buying, and at a whole lot less overall cost, too.

  2. I’ve wondered how big of a patrol boat could one base out of a LPD? Instead of making a sea going vessel that can do littoral, make one you can carry to the area of operations.

  3. I’ve always like small ships like this going back to watching movies about PT boats in WW2. Do any of you guys remember the US Navy Pegasus class hydrofoils? I wish the Navy had kept them. I think they would be beneficial today where they probably weren’t during the Cold War.

    1. Back when I was a young Tom Clancy dork and mangling 1/720 model kits of Ticos and Perrys, they used to come with an extra sprue for a bonus Pegasus and some Landing Craft. I remember thinking then how useful something like that would be for patrolling a coastal area, and my opinion is about the same now. Back then it was all about keeping the sea lane open in case operation Reforger was put into effect during WWIII. I could see how they didn’t fit into that kind of Navy.

      But nowadays, they would be perfect for a pirate fight. And they had the missile tubes to put up a fight against larger ships too. I’m sure if they could work in some stealth, super fusion turbines and a rail gun, the Navy might be interested in them again.

    2. Those Pegasi were cool little ships. I believe they cost two arms and a leg to keep running, though.

      But yeah, I’d take a couple of them.

      One of the reasons I like the Sa’ar 4 over some of the later models is that it mounts one or two 76mm guns. Yes, obviously missiles are crucial. But a nice gun is handy to have.

      Put a Phalanx 1B on the rear deck in place of one of the 76mm and you add some anti-air and anti-missile protection while increasing your capabilities against little surface crappers.

      The Pegasus boats had a 76mm, also.

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